Tag: Vietnam

Hanoi, Vietnam

Hanoi, Vietnam

According to abbreviationfinder, Hanoi is the capital city of Vietnam. Located on the banks of the Red River. During the period that the Han dynasty was in power, the city was the administrative center of China under the colonial system that that country established in the region. It is the economic nucleus of Vietnam and despite the fact that it only has 3.6% of the country’s population and 0.3 percent of the national territory, it contributes more than 8% of GDP and 45 percent of the national economy..

Hanoi is located on the right bank of the Red River, specifically between the coordinates: 21 ° 2′0 ″ N 105 ° 51′0 ″ E at about 308 masl (meters above sea level), occupying an area of 921 km², according to the 2005 census. The city has an estimated population of 3,145,300 residents. Between 1954 and 1976 it was the capital of North Vietnam.

History

During the period that the Han dynasty was in power, the city was the administrative center of China under the colonial system that this country established in the region. In 1873, when the city was occupied by the French, the city was influenced by Western culture, which brought with it a Western-style urban transformation and by 1887 Hanoi had become the capital of French Indochina.

In 1940 the famous city was occupied by the Japanese but just five years later it was liberated by China, after which it became the seat of the Vietnamese government.

Between 1946 and 1954, the attacks to reconquer the important city took off again, which is why Hanoi was again involved in a great battle against the French who tried to regain control of this country by taking control of the strategic capital, but were defeated by the Vietnamese from which the city became the capital of North Vietnam.

The 2 of July of 1976 after culminating the famous Vietnam War, came the reunification of Vietnam in the north and Vietnam in the South and Hanoi became the capital of the nascent state, which was rebuilt due to disasters left by the war, especially those suffered by the bombings that destroyed its bridges and railways that had left the great Asian city practically isolated.

Geography

The city is located on the right bank of the famous Red River, between the coordinates: 21 ° 2′0 ″ N 105 ° 51′0 ″ E at about 308 masl (meters above sea level) and occupying an area of 921 km².

Climate

It has a climate where the summers are hot and humid and the winters are relatively cool and dry, which is typical of the north of the country.

Precipitation

Most of the year’s rainfall occurs in the summer months, covering the months from May to September, although some rains can be recorded in the spring. The average annual rainfall is 1,682 ° mm. See population of Vietnam.

Temperatures

The winter months are relatively dry and cover the stage between the months of November and March. The minimum temperature in winter in Hanoi can drop to 6–7 ° C, while in summer it can reach 38 – 40 ° C.

Population

Hanoi is an important metropolitan area in northern Vietnam that has 3,145,300 residents according to the 2005 census. It is a great city that is in constant growth and constant changes and its population is a faithful reflection of this.

It is said that by nature Hanoians are people of great discipline, cordiality, kindness, modesty, culture and education among many other values, which, it is said, is a reflection of the past when many of the talents in the arts arose and were grouped in it. and education of the country, as well as of the system strongly entrenched in Confucian values where modesty and consideration of others had more priority than their own.

Economy

Hanoi is the economic nucleus of Vietnam and although it only has 3.6% of the country’s population and 0.3 percent of the national territory, it contributes more than 8% of the GDP and 45 percent of the economy. national.

Since 1990, the city has experienced accelerated growth in its economy, clearly reflected in the rapid increase in industrial production, which for 2003 registered an average annual growth of over 20.9%. In this economic activity, the city has more than eight industrial parks and many others that are in the completion phase.

The branch of commerce is another sector that has taken on a lot of growth in the city, which is expressed in the more than 2,000 businesses that Hanoi had already involved in foreign trade by 2003 and the establishment of relations with more than 161 countries and territories.

The non-governmental economic sector is also rapidly expanding, with more than 25,000 businesses operating under the Business Law.

Exports have grown extraordinarily and major changes in the economic structure have yielded excellent results, notably the extraordinary leaps in the sphere of tourism, finance and the banking sector, all of which together place Hanoi as the city. with the highest human development index among cities in Vietnam.

Districts

The city is divided into nine inner and five outer districts. The nine interiors are:

  • Ba Đình
  • Cầu Giấy
  • Đống Đa
  • Hoàn Kiếm
  • Hai Bà Trưng
  • Hoàng Mai
  • Long Well
  • Tây Hồ
  • Thanh Xuân

The five exteriors are:

  • Đông Anh
  • Gia Lâm
  • Từ Liêm
  • Thanh Trì
  • Sóc Sơn

Hanoi, Vietnam

Vietnam Economy Overview

Vietnam Economy Overview

According to thereligionfaqs, Viet Nam is a traditionally agricultural country, like the other states of the Indochinese peninsula; its economic structures before the forced and very long political division presented a substantial unity, linked as they were both to the common matrix of a typically rural world and to the same interventions operated by the colonial regime, even if the French presence had been more marked in the South of Village. The most relevant effects of colonial rule were the introduction of plantation crops (the main ones were those of Hevea, tea, coffee), the construction of roads and railways, the birth of the first industries, the strengthening of extractive activities, the opening of the country to foreign trade: with only partially positive repercussions for the Vietnamese economy. The massive importation of artifacts, especially from France, provoked the crisis of the flourishing local craftsmanship, only partially replaced by the productions of the new industries, the proceeds of which benefited foreign financial groups anyway. On the other hand, the country drew very little profits from plantation agriculture, while there was a widespread decline in food farming. At the same time it was forming, especially in the then Saigon, seat of the French administration, a class of officials openly corrupt and totally subordinate to foreign interests: French first, then Americans. With the division of the country and the establishment of two clearly opposed political regimes, the respective economic structures also underwent radical changes, although in both southern and northern Viet Nam the protracted war of enormous proportions prevented any real development. and conditioned a large part of the production activity to its own needs. In the North, however, from the first years of independence, the foundations were laid for the transformation of the economy in a socialist sense. It concerned above all the agricultural regime, which was subjected to reforms aimed at the elimination of large private property and the creation of state-owned companies and even more so of cooperatives, facilitated by the traditional community spirit of the Vietnamese people. The industrial sector also received considerable impulses, through direct government intervention as regards the major companies, but also indirectly by soliciting the  formation of artisanal cooperatives and small industries subsidized by the state, decentralized and generally not separated from rural life: this as a solution to the problems of industrialization in a country with strong agricultural traditions, a bit like it happened in China in the period of the “great leap forward”.

During the twenty years of division in the South, on the other hand, a line of development was intensively followed industrialization in a country with strong agricultural traditions, a bit like it occurred in China in the period of the “great leap forward”. During the twenty years of division in the South, on the other hand, a line of development was intensively followed industrialization in a country with strong agricultural traditions, a bit like it occurred in China in the period of the “great leap forward”. During the twenty years of division in the South, on the other hand, a line of development was intensively followed capitalistic: an orientation facilitated by the fact, which has already been mentioned, that in this part of the country the colonial presence had operated in a more profound way, arousing a mentality and economic situations more solicited in the Western sense. The war naturally conditioned every subsequent development, both for the US action aimed at creating military infrastructures and for the very serious economic and social imbalances deriving from the war situation; in particular, the flight of the peasant populations towards Saigon contributed to further impoverish the already precarious agriculture, while the city became overstated, creating social classes without a true identification and a true activity. It can be said that in principle the North Vietnamese productive structures, simple and flexible, have held up sufficiently well to tremendous impact of the war, facilitating at the end of the conflict the effort, however powerful, for the rebuilding of the country; on the other hand, southern Viet Nam found itself with a confused economic situation, weighed down by bad governance and corruption, burdened by the phenomenon of the very strong urbanization, while the rural masses, moving to the cities, had by now interrupted all links with the traditional environment of life and work. However, the differentiation between the two sections of the country grew as a result of the new economic policy guidelines introduced since 1986. Once the modest results of forced collectivization had been ascertained, a process of liberalization was in fact initiated aimed at increasing the productivity of a system that appeared to be largely overburdened. from the inefficiency of the nationalized sectors, opening the country to foreign investments, protected by the same new Constitution of 1992 and to a market-oriented socialist economy.

Vietnam Economy Overview