Tag: Vermont

Vermont Overview

Vermont Overview

According to Abbreviationfinder, Vermont is the second smallest state in terms of population, has 609,000 residents and the sixth smallest in terms of geographic area.

Geographically, Vermont is of interest primarily with the Green Mountains in the west and Lake Champlain in the northwest. It borders Massachusetts to the south, New Hampshire to the east, New York to the west, and the Canadian province of Quebec to the north.

The lands of Vermont were originally inhabited by Indian tribes ( Iroquois, Algonquin peoples and Abnaki ). France later claimed Vermont, but today’s state became a British colony after France lost the French and Indian Wars. For many years it was ruled by the surrounding colonies, which met fierce resistance from the “boys of the Green Mountains”. After American independence following the Revolutionary War, Vermont became the 14th state to join the union.

Known for nature, dairy, and maple syrup, Vermont has long been associated with progressive politics and the Democratic Party.

One of IBM ‘s large microelectronics plants is located near Burlington. In 2015, the plant was handed over to GlobalFoundries. It takes over the mass production of some of the chips that IBM designs and uses in its computers. The plant provides thousands of jobs for residents of the small state.

History

Before the Europeans arrived, the Iroquois tribes of New York and the Algonquin tribes of New England fought for possession of the territory of Vermont. The first European known to have explored the region was the Frenchman Samuel de Champlain, who in 1609 reached the lake that was later named after him. The first British settlement was Fort Dummer or Brattleboro (1724), to the south.

In the 1760s, a wave of settlers came to this territory from Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts. These settlers, aided by Benedict Arnold, seized Fort Ticonderoga and drove British forces out of the Lake Champlain region months before American independence was declared. In 1777, the colonists adopted a separate Constitution and, after the war, formed an independent republic that lasted until 1791. In 1791, Vermont was admitted to the Union.

Vermont experienced a population explosion between the 1790s and 1820s. The railroad favored the creation of cities that served as stations and facilitated some economic development, which was offset by a lack of industrial facilities and a tendency to make agriculture the basis of the state economy.

Marble and granite quarries, specialized industrial machinery industries, and the growth of the tourism industry gained prominence in the late 1800s and early 1900s, providing a decisive new boost to the Vermont economy.

Geography

Vermont is famous for its long and snowy winters, when people from all over the world come to enjoy its wonderful winter resorts. Temperatures are almost always negative during the period December – February, sometimes falling below -20 ° C. Summers are short and cool, with an average daily temperature in July – August of the order of 22 ° C

Climate

In terms of climate, Vermont has long winters and short summers. Most of the state receives a lot of precipitation in the form of snow, reaching 3,175 mm a year in many mountain areas.

Vermont flora and fauna

About three-quarters of Vermont’s land area is covered in forests, consisting primarily of hardwood species such as ash, beech, birch, hickory, maple, and oak. The large coniferous forests to the northeast are made up of pines and firs.

The white-tailed or Virginia deer is, of the large mammal species, the most important game in Vermont. Bobcat and coyote are also common, as are beaver, muskrat, otter, rabbit, squirrel, groundhog, and raccoon. Traditionally, the state has had good mineral resources, with deposits of copper, tin, iron ore, silver, manganese and gold.

Vermont’s agriculture sector is small by comparison, but it makes up a significant part of the state’s economy. The most valuable product is milk; equally important are cattle, egg production, hay and apple farming, and maple syrup.

Manufacturing is the most prominent sector of the state economy, focused on electronic equipment, industrial machinery, printing materials, paper and its derivatives, articles of wood and stone, processed foods, precision instruments and aerospace and transportation equipment.

Politics

The state is known for its liberal politics and independent political thought, in this respect it is the only state that has had a Social Democratic governor, outside the Democratic and Republican parties. In April 2009, the law was approved that allows homosexuals to marry without any legal restriction. According to CountryAAH.com, Montpelier is the capital city of the U.S. state of Vermont and the seat of Washington County.

Vermont Overview