Tag: Spain

Travel to Formentera, Spain

Travel to Formentera, Spain

Formentera (Balearic Islands)

With the boat it takes about half an hour to reach the island of Formentera from Ibiza. Formentera is a Balearic island with a feel-good character and high relaxation value. Calm, enchanting landscape and nature together with crystalline water contribute to this attribute.

Formentera is the fourth largest of the Balearic Islands, the size of thesmallIsland is just 82 square kilometers. Except for two plateaus, it is extremely flat. The two elevations are in the south. These are light chalk hills with the 107 meters high Puig Guillem and the massif of La Mola (192 meters high). Both are located on Cabo de Berbería and are connected by a flat, narrow headland.

The history of Formentera is not as well documented. However, this Balearic island has a multitude of relics from prehistory.

The climate in Formentera is said to be the healthiest in Spain. The air is relatively clean and the climate is temperate. All of the places on the island are no further than 10 km from the sea, so you can feel the well-known balancing effect of the water on the entire island.

The summers are dry and warm, but not too hot, the winters are usually very humid. The time from late spring to early autumn is excellent for a trip to Formentera. Rainfalls can be expected from mid-October to the end of February. When choosing clothing, you should think of sturdy shoes for hiking and in the evening you often need a jacket on the islands, and you shouldn’t forget to wear rain gear. Formentera has only one country road. You can get around the island by rental car, bus, taxi or rent a scooter. If you want to be active, take a bike tour, certainly a nice alternative to enjoy the beauty of the island. The port of La Sabina in Formentera can be reached regularly by ship from Eivissa in Ibiza. In addition, you can translate with a motorboat.

The capital of the island is Sant Francesc Xavier, better known by his Castilian name “San Francisco”. The town hall is here, as well as the main post office and the Formentera police station.

La Savina, a small port settlement on the island, is intended more as a transit station for most visitors to the island. The first impression is modern and a little impersonal. There is also a huge marina in La Savina, which in summer hosts yachts from all over the world. A visit to one of the harbor cafés lets you watch the hustle and bustle when the boats arrive or depart.

A popular anchorage for small boats can be found in the Estany des Peix salt lake which is southwest of La Savina. It is an important resting area for water birds and is also part of a nature reserve under special protection. Bathing is not very tempting here.

The Estany Pudent located east of La Savina. He is also called the “smelly fairy”. This is a brackish lake that develops a disgusting smell on very hot days and also attracts a large number of mosquitoes. To the north of the lake are the Salines Marroig, known as the largest salt pans on the Balearic island of Formentera. The salt pans on the island have been out of service for years, but they are of great importance for the ecosystem and therefore enjoy the status of “Reserva Natural de ses Salines” special protection.

The island has a tourist mecca: “Es Pujols”. Mostly package travelers spend their vacation here, but compared to Ibiza or Mallorca, for example, it has a rather village-like character.

Other attractions include: the Església Sant Francesc Xavier, built in 1726, a small chapel, Sa Tanca Vella, from the 14th century and the Folklore Museum Museu Etnològic with a collection of old costumes, tools and photos. Visit vaultedwatches.com for Spain travel destinations.

Many different habitats on Formentera allow diverse plant species to spread. Especially in spring, the blaze of color is huge and even on “poor” soils, there are real seas of flowers. Numerous herbs and wild flowers grow here, as well as capers, gorse, oleander, dwarf palms and lemons.

The wildlife in Formentera has not much to offer. There is a wide variety of reptiles, birds, and insects. Many butterflies, flamingos, lizards and the osprey are among the residents of the island.

Formentera geography

Formentera belongs to the archipelago of the Balearic Islands and is located in the western Mediterranean in the Gulf of Valencia. It is the fourth largest and at the same time the southernmost island of the autonomous community of the Balearic Islands. At the same time, Formentera belongs to the independent archipelago of the Pityuses, which consists of the neighboring island of Ibiza and many small rocky islets.

Formentera is about 100 kilometers from mainland Spain and about 250 kilometers from the African continent. The distance to Ibiza is about twelve kilometers. The total area of ​​Formentera is 83 square kilometers. The island is around 14 kilometers long and can have a maximum width of 15 kilometers. Of the The main town of the island is Sant Francesc de Formentera.

Formentera is only separated from its neighboring island of Ibiza by a narrow arm of water. Although the island is not large, it can boast an almost spectacular variety of landscapes. Sandy beaches alternate with steep cliffs, and the interior of the island is characterized by pine forests, barren heather and fertile fields and orchards.

The otherwise rather flat Formentera consists of the two plateaus Cap de Barbària in the southwest and La Mola in the east. A narrow, flat isthmus connects the two small high plateaus. Sa Talaiassa is located on La Mola and, at only 192 meters, is the highest point on Formentera. Overall, the elevation profile is much lower than on Ibiza. The island’s 69-kilometer coastline is characterized by extremely long sandy beaches and very rocky cliffs.

As in Ibiza, Formentera has the salt pan so characteristic of the Pityusen archipelago. This typical landscape for the island emerged about six million years ago, when Formentera, which at that time still consisted of a mountain range, protruded from a desert of salt deposits and salty swamps.

Travel to Formentera, Spain

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (11)

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (11)

Why did you even go abroad during your studies? – I hear this question a lot.

I had actually planned to spend a while abroad after graduating from high school, but at the age of 18 I just didn’t have the courage to take this step into practice. Now, a few years later, I still had great respect for living in another country for four months, as I had lived exclusively at home up until that point, but I wanted to take on this challenge.

I’m studying communication management and in the fifth semester there wasn’t much on the curriculum anyway. The timing seemed perfect! But where should the journey go? Since I made the decision to study abroad with reservations, I decided to definitely do the semester in Europe. Since I am studying communication management, it is very important to speak fluent English, but I was also very excited to learn another language.

The Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona appeared with their Pre-Established Program, which offers courses in both English and Spanish, perfect for my project. No sooner said than done: I inquired, applied through MicroEDU and received an offer for a place at university. It quickly became clear: From September 2016 I will be going to Spain for just under 4 months !

The apartment search

First of all, it should be said that looking for an apartment in Barcelona is anything but easy. A fellow student of mine had also decided to do a semester abroad at the UAB and so we looked for an apartment together. However, perplexity quickly spread, as many forums and housing agencies were either super overpriced or anything but serious. Often we were advised to fly over there one or two weeks before the start of studies and look for an apartment on site, but without any knowledge of Spanish we were rather skeptical. Ultimately, we joined all kinds of Facebook groups and, with a lot of luck, were able to temporarily rent an apartment from a German couple. Five minutes’ walk to the nearest metro station and 10 minutes to the beach – it couldn’t be more perfect!

Here we go

On 08/30/2016 the time had come. I made my way to the airport full of anticipation, but also full of concerns. We arrived in Barcelona late in the evening and drove to Placa Catalunya, where we were picked up by our landlady. The first impressions were just overwhelming. When I finally lay in bed in the evening, however, I felt a strange feeling again. I fell asleep wondering whether that was the right decision. This feeling didn’t last long, however. The city was just overwhelming and I quickly got to know new people at university. I was lucky that my courses were well laid out and so I only had to go to university on Mondays and Wednesdays. Otherwise I had a lot of free time to discover the city.

Life in Spain is very different than in Germany and it took some getting used to for me at first. At home I’ve never had a late dinner – but in Spain you start at 8 p.m. at the earliest. Well, I wanted to get to know a different culture and I couldn’t change it anyway, as most of the kitchens had closed beforehand. But you got used to it really quickly.

The time in Spain was like vacation. The weather was amazing, even in December there were days when I could still lie on the beach at 20 degrees. It was just fantastic. In general, we spent a large part of our day on the beach. When the sun was gone, we went to the Spanish streets to eat tapas and drink sangria. Read more student reviews on Act-test-centers.

I had the feeling that even the Spaniards were in a permanent holiday mood in their beautiful city. For routes that you drive by car in Germany, you simply put on your sunglasses in Barcelona and walked. Right from the start I noticed that there is so much that is so amazing to discover in this city and that the time of just under four months will never be enough. In addition, the Spaniards always have something to celebrate – it feels like a “fiesta” takes place every other day and the whole city is in a lively atmosphere.

The Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona is just impressive as it is in the old St. Pau Hospital. The lectures were great fun and I met people from all over the world. In general, you couldn’t compare the course with the German one. The way of learning was completely different. More playful and more academic, but still effective.

Life in Barcelona is comparable in price to Germany. Housing prices are the same as in major German cities and leisure activities are also comparably expensive. The metro card cost me about 100 € for the entire time, which was fine. Eating out and, above all, fresh purchases were even significantly cheaper than in Germany, but you still didn’t save because you eat out more often in Spain than in Germany.

My personal highlights definitely included the sunsets on the Bunkers del Carmel, the many small bars and cafes, where one was sweeter and more beautiful than the other, the fountains on Placa Espanya, the many weekend trips to different Spanish cities, the evenings, where I got to know the Korean culture because the Koreans cooked for us and much, much more.

Conclusion

All in all, I can say it was the best time of my life and all concerns were in vain. In the four months I got to know and love an amazing city and incredibly lovely people. I really enjoyed Spanish life and culture ! Everything is much more relaxed and it was appreciated for trying to speak Spanish. Personally, I grew a lot during this time, which simply passed far too quickly. One thing is certain: Barcelona – you will see me again!

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona 11

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (10)

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (10)

My time at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (Spring 2011)

To make it easier, I would best describe my semester abroad in chronological order:

As a business administration graduate student, I started looking for a program that would fit perfectly into my course of study in terms of time and would also give me the opportunity to improve another language (besides English). I took a practical semester time off at the university and began an internship in July 2010, which I completed by the end of the year. After extensive research on the Internet and the choice of language to be Spanish (as I had already learned Spanish at school for 3 years), the Pre-Established Study Abroad Program offered me the best possible conditions. In terms of time, it also fit perfectly into my semester planning, as I could start right after the internship and was back at my home university in the second week of the new semester. Read more student reviews on Andyeducation.

August / September 2010 – application (preparation) and choice of subjects

Since I wanted to submit my application on time, I have already requested all the necessary documents after MicroEDUs had sent me all the relevant forms and documents. I was able to send all the documents for the “check” to Münster in advance and was also informed about the expected start of the application. Since I had read beforehand that the places in this program are in great demand, I submitted my documents right at the start of the application and had no further problems.

I chose my subjects according to my main interests, as I couldn’t expect any credits. In retrospect, I can especially recommend the “International Marketing” course and of course the Spanish language course. I had 4 subjects including the language course and felt very well occupied and still had time to enjoy Barcelona to the fullest.

December 2010 – looking for an apartment

Luckily, shortly before it started, I had already been promised an apartment through a good friend. Therefore, unfortunately, I cannot tell you how you can find a good place to stay in Barcelona quickly and easily. During the time I lived in Barcelona in the “El Born” district. This was a direct hit for me in every respect, as it is only a few minutes’ walk to the beach, the Ramblas and only a few stops by underground to the two university buildings of the program. Therefore, I would recommend this district without hesitation and can say that there is a lot to discover and experience in addition to many small bars, restaurants and cafes.

From my friends there, I can say that Eixample is also a recommendable residential area. Central, well located for the university and also with a wide range of options for going out.

The standard of the apartments was on average below that of the German, the rooms were smaller, but the whole city had a different flair. Many old buildings, small alleys and the people make Barcelona a cozy, modern and diverse metropolis.

January 2010 – Uni, life, enjoyment

About the university:
The Eixample campus is centrally located and modern. The opposite is the Sant Pau campus, which is also a real insider tip for tourists thanks to its architecture and history. I had fans in both places, which means a bit of “pendulum”, but it is quite bearable.
I particularly liked that the courses were small, the proportion of project work and group work in the semester was large and the exams were fair at the end. So you shouldn’t have any problems passing courses there. Instruction is required in almost every course, but is not 100% checked and also allows some absenteeism. AND: Friday is really a day off there! The lecturers are friendly, personal and committed to the matter. Above all, they also know that in the semester abroad you want to experience so much more besides university and are therefore not that strict.

To the city:
party, beach, culture, history and big city feeling – Barcelona unites all of this. The range of parties and nightlife options is almost endless and offers something new every day. For sunny days, a visit to the beach is a good idea, where you can quickly forget that you live in a big city. Museums and various festivals as well as a large number of excursion possibilities do not make a Sunday boring. It is a good idea to plan an excursion destination in or around Barcelona for each week in order to get to know the city and the country in peace and with good preparation.

About life: In
terms of quality of life, the Spanish food deserves a special mention! The many small restaurants and bars offer tapas as well as many other inexpensive surprises and delights! Just go to one of the small restaurants in the side streets and try it out! In addition to the food, the Spanish cava is also a must-have that I really miss in Germany. In the supermarket and in larger department store chains there is everything your heart desires. You should definitely buy fruit and vegetables at Boqueria! The prices are comparable to those here in Germany and of course differ in a few cases due to availability. All in all, apart from the rent, life there was not particularly more expensive than in Germany.

For living:
Prices for a room (6-10 m²) are, in my experience, between 300 and 500 €. In any case, it is important to note the proximity to the subway, the distance to the university and, in winter, the availability of heating! This is not a matter of course for many landlords. Otherwise it may well be that you get or move into an apartment without a rental agreement.

About the language:
First of all: NO, the Catalans also speak Spanish and are friendly when you are! In my time I never had any problems communicating and after a while you quickly learn to use “everyday sentences”. The daily language course is really helpful and has given me a solid language base. The language in the university is English and for a few subjects and advanced students also Spanish. However, 90% of the courses are American, which is why we speak English in class or in group work.

April 2011 – conclusion

I am very happy with my choice and still benefit from the impressions and experiences in these almost 4 months. The only point of criticism that you should bear in mind when making your choice is that no Spanish students are admitted to this program. This means that you are only among “internationals” and that you will mostly speak English. I benefited from both and during this time I was able to improve my English in addition to Spanish. However, it is more difficult to get to know locals or Spaniards if you don’t have them at university.

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona 10

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (9)

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (9)

I completed my semester abroad as part of my dual business administration degree (focus on trade) at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. In Germany, this winter semester (January-March) corresponded to my third theory semester, which in retrospect was not that cheap, as I have to rewrite many exams at home after my return. Nevertheless, I would recommend the semester abroad in Barcelona to anyone who is interested in international (mostly US-American) encounters and still doesn’t want to get a culture shock.

The application process

The application process was very easy, I didn’t really have to clarify a lot in advance. At my home university in Heidenheim I used the International Office to find out which partner universities are offered and finally I decided on the UAB. The decisive factor here was the duration: a semester only lasts three and a half months – and not a full six months as at other universities (which would not have been an option for my training company). Unfortunately, the UAB is not the cheapest choice in terms of price: you pay around 600-1000 euros per module that you occupy.

When the decision was made, I worked with the International Office to collect the necessary registration forms (transcript of records, copy of ID and a few other small items). The contact to MicroEDU was then established via the International Office and I only had to wait until their contact person got in touch with me by email.

MicroEDU then guided me through the further registration process and sent the documents to the university in Barcelona. I have to mention here: the agency’s employees (especially Ms. Ezerskyte) are extremely friendly and always remain polite and helpful, no matter how frequently you ask ! Thanks a lot for this!

That’s about it, MicroEDU informed me that I was accepted (of course: if you pay the deposit of a few hundred euros on time, you will probably not just be refused…) and I was able to book my outward flight for January 4th. The semester started on January 7th, so I had a few stress-free days to look for accommodation from my hotel.

The accommodation

I looked for my accommodation on site – and without any knowledge of Spanish! I definitely want to encourage you to do the same! If you book a room in advance without having viewed it, there is a good chance that you will be nastily surprised when you arrive…

For me it was no stress at all to find a small room in a four-person shared apartment near the Sagrada Familia. I registered with idealista on the first day and looked for offers there. Already on the following day there were two appointments for viewing and to be honest? You can also communicate with your hands and feet if the other person doesn’t speak good English and you don’t speak Spanish yourself.

I definitely recommend the Eixample districts (here in particular near the Sagrada Familia or Sant Antoni) and Gracia. I would personally advise against Poble Sec and Gotico, but that only depends on my experience.

The University

I won’t tell you anything new – anyone who has read through a few testimonials from the university will quickly find that this semester abroad consists of everything but skipping courses, studying with local students and just lazing around. If you want to get good German grades here (and thanks to the Spanish grading system they are really hard to achieve), you have to move to every lecture and sit on your butt even after “school” (yes, you study in small groups) and do homeworks, assignments or book readings. Those who stick with it as in the dual study course should, however, be able to keep their grades in Germany (at least to some extent).

What was also a bit disappointing: The UAB emphasizes the high degree of international students. Contrary to what I expected, I found myself in all four courses with 95% students from the USA. Basically, of course, that didn’t bother me, I also formed a close friendship with two girls from New York. But unfortunately the semester abroad is only half as “multicultural” as one had hoped it would…

My courses taken

I took four courses: International Marketing Strategies, International Finance, International Economics and Strategic Behavior in Business and Economics.

International Marketing

I had International Marketing Strategies at Dr. Vera Butkouskaya and that was my absolute favorite module ! Vera was always in a good mood and with her funny manner she was super personable for all students! She also knew that we would like to enjoy our semester abroad instead of just looking at things and therefore hardly gave us any homework or assignments. The material itself was also very interesting, albeit a bit dry from time to time.

International Finance

International finance was a tough counterpart to marketing: I was mostly in the course with finance majors and of course they also had previous knowledge. Unfortunately, I didn’t and so the lessons with Myriam went a bit too fast for me and I had to learn a lot. However, anyone who enjoys financial topics is in good hands here. The exams were also very fair, so that even a beginner could achieve good grades with a learning curve.

International Economics

International economics was similarly difficult. David Castell was convinced that each of his international students should read a book of at least 200 pages during that time and also buy the “ABSOLUTELY BASIC” book to accompany the lectures so that you are at home (because you are only in Barcelona to study ) can read on and deepen his Econ knowledge independently… the expectations took a lot of getting used to and that should have been the reason why I did by far the worst in this subject out of all four modules.

Strategic Behavior

Strategic behavior at Ivanna Ferdinandova was… unhappy. The lecture was on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 9 am, which implies tired students. The fact that the transmission of the content was THAT cumbersome didn’t make the whole thing any better. My neighbor at the bank regularly fell asleep and the other students also preferred to go to the next European travel destinations with their MacBooks rather than listening to Ivanna’s words. The material – Decision Theory and Game Theory – was very interesting! However, you only noticed this when you yourself have dealt with the homeworks or the final presentation yourself at home.

Language course

I would definitely not recommend a UAB Spanish course as it is way too expensive! Right around the corner from the campus in Eixample there is a language school – LinguaSchools – which offers the same number of courses per week (twice a week from 7 am to 9 pm) and is significantly cheaper. Instead of 1000 euros like the UAB, this language school only charges around 300 euros and learning success is also guaranteed if you are willing to deal with the new language! It made it easy for me to learn the basics of Spanish. Read more student reviews on Anycountyprivateschools.

Please, please don’t think I want to talk you through the semester in Barcelona because I almost only report negative things here! Barcelona itself is a beautiful city and there is so much to experience over the weekend (especially because Fridays are always free!)! The city offers much more than just the typical tourist attractions!

Leisure

The three and a half months in Barcelona passed far too quickly! Every single weekend is worth gold and you shouldn’t waste any of it in a bad mood at home! I almost never saw clouds or even rain in my winter semester, which made it all the easier to leave the apartment and have fun on the streets of Barcelona!

You can really get home quickly by public transport at any time of the day or night, which was a great benefit for me as a country man. In addition, you have the beach, beautiful parks and mountains all rolled into one: what more could you want? I spent differently every weekend and got infected by the American wanderlust. From El Prat Airport in Barcelona we went to three different destinations: Seville, Lisbon and ( my absolute highlight! ) Ibiza.

I can only recommend you to explore the surrounding area and look out for cheap deals on flights, because it’s worth it! Ibiza in particular is amazing out of season! All the clubs were closed and there was almost no sign of tourists. The four of us rented a car for a weekend and then we are completely around the island – always following the sun towards hidden beaches and the perfect spots for the sunset over the sea.

My final message to you: don’t be afraid to fly to Barcelona for a semester abroad! The advantages clearly outweigh the disadvantages (for example the high costs), I really enjoyed this time in Spain and I will definitely come back there again!

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona 9

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (8)

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (8)

1. Application process

The application process for Barcelona is very simple. After I was sure that I wanted to go to Barcelona, ​​I applied through the free agency “ MicroEDU ”. The semester abroad started on September 3rd and I applied in March, right at the beginning of the application phase. I applied for the “Pre-established study abroad program”, in which almost all courses are in English and the university campus is right in the center of Barcelona.

All I had to do to apply was submit the following documents:

  • List of selected courses
  • Copy of the certificate of enrollment
  • Copy of the transcript of records
  • Copy of an identification document
  • Passport photo
  • English test (the DAAD test is sufficient)

The agency then sends the complete application to Barcelona and you don’t have to worry about anything.

After you have received an acceptance you have to pay 500 €. This should be done quickly, as the students who pay first also get into their desired courses. This was not a problem for me and I was able to take the courses I wanted. Depending on the course chosen, the remaining tuition fees are due approximately 4 weeks before the start of the semester.

At the beginning of the semester there is the so-called “add-and-drop period”, where you can try to swap places in courses with other students. I wouldn’t rely on that, however.

2. Description of the city and region

Barcelona is located in the north-eastern part of Spain and directly on the Mediterranean Sea. It is the capital of the region of Catalonia and around 1.6 million people live within the urban area. In my opinion, Barcelona is one of the most beautiful cities around. It offers endless possibilities for exploring and of course the beach is a huge plus. I found the people to be consistently open-minded. Everyone was helpful, open and friendly.

The German weather cannot be compared with the Spanish weather. In my 4 months I only had 4 rainy days and never had clouds in the sky. Even in mid-November we could still lie on the beach in bikinis. So you have a completely different and more positive outlook on life in Barcelona.

3. Finding accommodation

Finding an apartment in Barcelona has turned out to be very easy, living rather complicated. There are countless pages on the Internet and also many groups on Facebook where you can search for apartments / shared flats. These include, for example, idealista, loquo.com, wg-sucht and pisocompartido. I checked the Internet beforehand and made viewing appointments for the first few days.

First of all, I have to say that the Spanish standard does not correspond to the German and I was a bit shocked at first. After a few visits, I found a small room in a shared apartment near the Sagrada Familia with 2 South Americans and an Indian and moved into it on the same day. There are an infinite number of free rooms in Barcelona and you can find a free room very quickly. In retrospect, I would prefer to live in the old town and I also found the “Raval” district, which was considered a bit dangerous, to be very beautiful.

In general, when looking for an apartment, I would also recommend paying attention to whether there is a functioning heating system and how noisy it is in the room. In Barcelona, ​​garbage collectors etc. always come at night and it can be very noisy and in winter without heating it can also be cold. Many of my friends and I had problems in the rooms / apartments, but many also felt very comfortable.

In the end I didn’t get along with my landlords and I moved for December without further ado. I would recommend having everything confirmed in writing. To insist on rent as well as deposit and, if necessary, on a written rental agreement.

4. Description of the university / faculty

The Autonomous University of Barcelona is divided into several locations.

The main campus is about 30 km from Barcelona. There are 2 buildings in the city where the courses of the “Pre-established” program take place. Only foreign students take part in this program, not Spaniards. Generally there are around 70% Americans, a lot of Brazilians, Dutch, Germans etc. The first campus is called “Sant Pau” and is a really nice building in Barcelona that also has a library.

The second campus, “Eixample” is located right in the city center and is rather simple, smaller and modern. My courses all took place on this campus. The classrooms are comparable to German classrooms in schools. There are around 20/25 students per course and it’s all very personal. A lecture lasts 1:40 hours and the first lesson begins at 9 a.m. There is a 20 minute break between each hour and a 1 hour break at noon. The last lecture lasts until 7:25 p.m.

5. Integration in the course of studies (BA)

The “Pre-established” program offers a large number of courses for foreign students. 6 credits are recognized per course. The semester at the UAB can only be taken in September, as the 1st semester always starts in January. Overall, the integration turned out to be very easy.

6. Description of the courses taken

The courses at UAB are very similar to those at school. Attendance is compulsory and you should collaborate orally. Unlike in Germany, there were not only exams at the end of the semester, but the grades were made up of many individual assessments. Most subjects have a final and a midterm exam, as well as many case studies and presentations.

Overall, it is “more stressful” during your studies than in Germany because you have to work continuously. On the other hand, it is significantly less at the end of the semester. A course takes place on Mondays and Wednesdays or Tuesdays and Thursdays. Friday is free and therefore everything is very easy to do.

I took 4 courses on site:

a) Doing business in emerging markets

In this course we dealt with economically emerging countries and markets. The course consisted of two parts. At the beginning of the semester we were assigned a partner and a country and had to present news from this country on a weekly basis. In addition to theory, we did a case study every week and also handed it in. After the midterm, each team had to give a presentation on the entry of a Spanish company into our emerging country.

There was both a midterm and a final exam in this course. The lecturer was very nice and it was very important that people not learn by heart but understand. I liked the course very much.

b) Cross-Cultural Management

This course was my favorite course. We discussed different cultural dimensions and due to the many nationalities in the class it was never boring and always interesting. We had to give and submit an individual presentation, a group presentation including a term paper, and at the end we wrote an exam.

c) Managerial Skills for International Business

I also really enjoyed this course. The lecturer was really very good and, in addition to theory, we also did a lot of role plays to consolidate the theory. It was mainly about “everyday” situations in professional life and how best to cope with them. This included, for example, time management and leadership skills. The lecturer varied between many media, so it was always interesting. There was a midterm and a final term.

d) International Marketing Strategies

I am also very satisfied with this course choice. It was the most time-consuming course for me with MicroEDUM. In addition to theories, we worked on a lot of case studies and applied marketing strategies. Within the course we had to write a midterm and a final exam. In addition, we worked out a term paper in groups and each had to give two presentations. Every week we were introduced to a new company and its strategy, about which we had to answer and submit questions.

Overall, I really enjoyed all of the courses. There is a clear difference when the teacher knows all students by name. In addition, it is a change that both attendance and participation are included in the final grade. It was a very personal atmosphere and I really took away a lot. I liked the fact that it was mostly less theoretical than in Germany. I can definitely recommend these courses and especially as a European (mostly hardworking and punctual in contrast to many Americans) it is really easy to get a good grade.

7. Statement of costs and financing options

Since the UAB is not a partner university of our university, I had to pay the tuition fees myself. I took 4 courses (24 ECTS) on site and paid € 2605.

I paid 370 € for the rent in the first 3 months and another 200 € for December because I wasn’t there for the whole month. I would definitely recommend asking the landlord whether it is possible to reduce the rent if you are no longer on site for a full month. Many landlords are very accommodating. Here I would also give the tip to have this confirmed in writing.

The public transport network in Barcelona is very well developed. Under 25s can buy a 3-month ticket for € 105, which I would definitely recommend. With this you can use the metro, the bus, the night bus and the tram.

I spent around € 400 a month on living, eating and drinking. I have to say that we went to dinner very often, tried a lot, went to many museums and exhibitions. If you cook yourself a lot, it is probably a lot cheaper.

I was in Barcelona most of the time and only visited a friend over the weekend in Valencia once. So I spent very little on trips.

For trips I can recommend everyone to use the long-distance bus, which, like in Germany, are very cheap.

Statement of costs

  • 4 courses: € 2605
  • Rent for 4 months: 1310 €
  • 3-month ticket: € 105
  • 1-month ticket: € 50
  • Living / eating / drinking: 400 € / month
  • Trips: 60 €
  • Security deposit: € 370
  • Flights: € 150
  • Spanish teacher: 400 €
  • Total: 6650 € (including deposit)

If you want to apply for BAföG abroad, you should do so as early as possible.

8. Professional and personal experience

I think Barcelona has brought me a lot, both professionally and personally.

The lessons were not predominantly theoretical, as in most German universities, but theories were often presented on the basis of cases, exercises, presentations or films and then analyzed. This made it possible to understand a lot of the material during the semester and you had to study less for exams. Read more student reviews on Educationvv.

Personally, Barcelona also brought me a lot. For me it was the first time to “stand on my own two feet” and live alone. I have become much more independent and open.

9. Tips for those interested

There is so much to see and discover in Barcelona. I would especially recommend the following places / restaurants:

  • Bunkers del Carmel (a must-do !!)
  • Restaurant “La Luna” (Carrer Abaixadors 10)
  • Bun Bo (Vietnamese) and Rosa Negra (Mexican) restaurants
  • La Xampaneyeria and for the best paella O’toxo tres hermanos
  • Girona (Dali Museum), Montserrat Monastery (day trip)
  • FC Barcelona football match
  • Sitges (or Costa Brava for beautiful beaches)

I can absolutely recommend Barcelona as a semester abroad !

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona 8

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (7)

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (7)

Preparation

If you decide to do a semester abroad, there are almost endless possibilities where you can do it. My choice fell on Spain and ultimately on Barcelona, ​​which I can really recommend to everyone. In addition to Barcelona, ​​Paris and Madrid were also shortlisted, but these were dropped due to the limited number of students. For this reason, I finally applied for a semester abroad in Barcelona at the UAB.

When the decision was made that I would like to do my semester abroad in Barcelona, the preparations for this somewhat exciting phase of life began. MicroEDU took over the organization and was the contact person for questions about the application and communication with the UAB. The registration process was very smooth and went without any major problems.

After the registration was carried out and the tuition fees paid, there was not much more organizational work to do. Only health insurance, credit card, identity card and possibly the international accident protection were checked again for validity. Then it was time to book a flight and find an apartment.

Finding accommodation in Barcelona

The finding accommodation in Barcelona is very difficult and the opinions on this are very different. The on-site search offers a number of possibilities, but the online search should not be underestimated either. If you take care of yourself on site and arrange a viewing, then you can spot any damage / fraudsters directly and decide against the apartment.

I found and booked my apartment together with my girlfriend through the agency SH Barcelona. Real estate agencies do have service fees, but they are very professional and provide good service and support. Our apartment was really very clean, nicely decorated and well located in the Eixample district.

Studied at the UAB

Studies at the UAB essentially consist of lectures, group work and presentations. The different courses, which were chosen in advance, bring interesting topics, but also a lot of work with them. However, the workload differs from course to course. Read more student reviews on Ehuacom.

The course selection at the UAB in Barcelona was already made with the binding registration at the university. The available courses with course descriptions could be accessed and compared via the university’s website. After consulting with the course director in Heidenheim, I decided on the courses in International Finance, International Business and International Economics. The courses were recorded and confirmed with the learning agreement.

With the beginning of the stay abroad, the division of the courses, the introduction by the head of the program and the handover of the timetables followed. The briefing was structured and without any further problems. The courses started the same week. In summary, the courses chosen were very structured, interesting and demanded high standards. I liked International Business best. This subject will be particularly helpful for my later work, as we have covered basic concepts and strategies that explain international cooperation between companies.

During the four months there were various offers of the UAB for cultural exchange and leisure activities together with Spanish students of the UAB. There was also the opportunity to attend lectures and meetings with entrepreneurs and business people from Barcelona. In general, the support from the host university was really very good. The administrators’ office was manned around the clock and they were available to answer any questions.

Barcelona

Life outside of university in Barcelona mainly took place on the beach, in the great squares, in small bars and cafes. Barcelona has a lot to offer here and it never gets boring. Street festivals, open-air concerts, watching sunsets – in Barcelona you feel like you’re on vacation.

In addition to Barcelona, ​​Spain also has other beautiful cities and landscapes to offer. During my stay I visited Madrid, Seville, Sitges and the mountains around Montserrat, the largest mountain in Catalonia. If the urge to travel is even greater, there are other destinations in Spain available.

The relaxed Spanish way of life is particularly noticeable in everyday life. Compared to the German attitude, it is very different and very challenging in some life situations. But in general the Spaniards, and especially the Catalans, are friendly people.

Conclusion

The study abroad should generate new ways of thinking and approaches to problems and general international experience for me. These goals were met in each case. Studying abroad was a great experience and helped me advance as a person. I would recommend it to anyone who wants to break out of their usual comfort zone. Because only then can you have these experiences.

The experience abroad also helps me academically and adds an international aspect to my studies so far. Personally, I also appreciate my decision to go abroad. Another good foundation stone has been laid for my further professional and academic development.

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona 7

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (6)

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (6)

Application process

From the beginning I wanted to go to Spain and get to know the language and the culture better. Since there is no good program in Spain at my university, I came across MicroEDU relatively through recommendations. Among other things, the Universidad Autonoma in Barcelona was proposed there. I already considered the city with its cultural possibilities and the location (Mediterranean Sea) to be perfect and the university is very respected and well rated. I chose the pre-established program because I didn’t have a good knowledge of Spanish, but also because I wanted to live in the center, but both programs certainly have their advantages and disadvantages. Everyone has to decide for themselves. Now I just had to apply that it turned out to be really not complicated. MicroEDU tells you exactly what to submit and when, so there were no further complications.

Preparation

Since I really wanted to learn the language better as soon as possible, I improved my Spanish with Babbel and with a few courses at the university in the semester before that so that I can at least express myself. That was important to me personally, but in general you can get by very well with English. Sometimes it was just helpful to be able to speak and understand a little. Otherwise I didn’t have to prepare myself like that. If you had forgotten anything in terms of clothing, etc., you could easily buy it in Barcelona.

Accommodation

However, a big topic on the agenda was the search for accommodation. I wanted to come into contact with other people and so I wanted to move into a shared apartment. In advance, I heard from many that it is easy to organize apartments on site. So, shortly before I left, I set up an account with Idealista and arranged to view my apartment. Read more student reviews on Hetongdiy.

When I arrived in Barcelona, ​​I first spent time in a hostel. The search for an apartment was not as easy as I had imagined. I had a lot of bad luck and after a few days I had already visited over 20 apartments without success. In the end I found an apartment in a perfect location (Placa Catalunya), albeit a little more expensive. In retrospect I am glad that I did it on site, because on the one hand I was able to get to know the roommates and on the other hand I couldn’t be surprised like many of my friends. It is stressful at the beginning, but you have to go through it.

Study in Barcelona and courses

My studies in Barcelona were very different from what I know from Germany. It was more like school. Attendance was compulsory for at least 80% of the courses. Nevertheless, I had a relatively relaxed schedule. In general, you only had university from Monday to Thursday and I had it twice a week from 9:00 a.m. to 12:40 p.m. and twice a week from 9:00 a.m. to 3:20 p.m. If you have free periods, I would try in the add and drop period to arrange my courses in such a way that they are in one piece, otherwise you cannot relax on the beach but have to pay attention to the time due to the lessons. I have taken the following five courses:

1. Spanish Elementary 45

As already mentioned, I wanted to learn Spanish and took the opportunity to go to a Spanish course. My professor was Chelo Aribas and she was super nice. She was very empathetic and fully engaged with the level of the course. She tried hard to give everyone a good grade. If you have a little feel for the language and have participated a little, you could get a very good grade. I would definitely choose this course again.

2. International Finance

That was my favorite course, but certainly because I also liked the subjects. If math or finance is not for you, I would advise against choosing the course. You should be careful and understand everything, as you can quickly get lost. My professor’s name was Myriam H. and she was also very cool and friendly.

3. International Marketing

Here, too, Myriam was my professor. Like the other, the course was a bit more work-intensive. She builds in various projects and case studies that should be presented in small groups. Everything is not so demanding but still involves work. In the exams you had to learn by heart. If you go through with it, however, you can get very good grades here as well.

4. Managerial skills

It was a little harder for me to get excited about this course. A lot of things were taught that are actually very banal. But I really liked the way my professor Maydo tried to put the material on an interesting level with stories from her own life or with games.

5. Entrepreneurship and New Venture Creation

I expected a lot from this course because it actually sounded very interesting. I was a little disappointed, but it was also a little bit because it was my only afternoon course. The professor Ortila Driga was very nice, but in my opinion was not able to convey the material in an interesting way.

Leisure

As a city, Barcelona has an incredible amount to offer. I was able to get a bike relatively at the beginning and rode around town, on the beach or wherever with my friends. As in Germany, the train is very well connected, which is why you can also take the train to visit the beautiful regions of Spain on a weekendcan explore. However, this is not absolutely necessary as you never get bored in Barcelona. I would recommend going out as much as possible. At the beginning it is often said that it is advised to be very careful because of the high crime rate. I can confirm that, but I was told so often at the beginning that I thought I was going to a city full of criminals. So there should be no fear and if you are careful and keep your eyes open and don’t go into a dark alley alone in the evening, nothing should happen to you.

Conclusion

In summary, I can say that Barcelona was an incredibly good time for me that I would repeat immediately. I have really taken Barcelona to my heart and will definitely be back often. Although I suffered a bit of a culture shock from the violent independence movements, I felt safe and welcome. I envy everyone who still has the great time ahead of them!

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona 6

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (5)

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (5)

Application process

From the beginning I wanted to go to Spain and get to know the language and the culture better. Since there is no good program in Spain at my university, I came across MicroEDU relatively through recommendations. Among other things, the Universidad Autonoma in Barcelona was proposed there. I already considered the city with its cultural possibilities and the location (Mediterranean Sea) to be perfect and the university is very respected and well rated. I chose the pre-established program because I didn’t have a good knowledge of Spanish, but also because I wanted to live in the center, but both programs certainly have their advantages and disadvantages. Everyone has to decide for themselves. Now I just had to apply that it turned out to be really not complicated. MicroEDU tells you exactly what to submit and when, so there were no further complications.

preparation

Since I really wanted to learn the language better as soon as possible, I improved my Spanish with Babbel and with a few courses at the university in the semester before that so that I can at least express myself. That was important to me personally, but in general you can get by very well with English. Sometimes it was just helpful to be able to speak and understand a little. Otherwise I didn’t have to prepare myself like that. If you had forgotten anything in terms of clothing, etc., you could easily buy it in Barcelona.

accommodation

However, a big topic on the agenda was the search for accommodation. I wanted to come into contact with other people and so I wanted to move into a shared apartment. In advance, I heard from many that it is easy to organize apartments on site. So, shortly before I left, I set up an account with Idealista and arranged to view my apartment.

When I arrived in Barcelona, ​​I first spent time in a hostel. The search for an apartment was not as easy as I had imagined. I had a lot of bad luck and after a few days I had already visited over 20 apartments without success. In the end I found an apartment in a perfect location (Placa Catalunya), albeit a little more expensive. In retrospect I am glad that I did it on site, because on the one hand I was able to get to know the roommates and on the other hand I couldn’t be surprised like many of my friends. It is stressful at the beginning, but you have to go through it.

Study in Barcelona and courses

My studies in Barcelona were very different from what I know from Germany. It was more like school. Attendance was compulsory for at least 80% of the courses. Nevertheless, I had a relatively relaxed schedule. In general, you only had university from Monday to Thursday and I had it twice a week from 9:00 a.m. to 12:40 p.m. and twice a week from 9:00 a.m. to 3:20 p.m. If you have free periods, I would try in the add and drop period to arrange my courses in such a way that they are in one piece, otherwise you cannot relax on the beach but have to pay attention to the time due to the lessons. I have taken the following five courses:

1. Spanish Elementary 45

As already mentioned, I wanted to learn Spanish and took the opportunity to go to a Spanish course. My professor was Chelo Aribas and she was super nice. She was very empathetic and fully engaged with the level of the course. She tried hard to give everyone a good grade. If you have a little feel for the language and have participated a little, you could get a very good grade. I would definitely choose this course again.

2. International Finance

That was my favorite course, but certainly because I also liked the subjects. If math or finance is not for you, I would advise against choosing the course. You should be careful and understand everything, as you can quickly get lost. My professor’s name was Myriam H. and she was also very cool and friendly.

3. International Marketing

Here, too, Myriam was my professor. Like the other, the course was a bit more work-intensive. She builds in various projects and case studies that should be presented in small groups. Everything is not so demanding but still involves work. In the exams you had to learn by heart. If you go through with it, however, you can get very good grades here as well.

4. Managerial skills

It was a little harder for me to get excited about this course. A lot of things were taught that are actually very banal. But I really liked the way my professor Maydo tried to put the material on an interesting level with stories from her own life or with games.

5. Entrepreneurship and New Venture Creation

I expected a lot from this course because it actually sounded very interesting. I was a little disappointed, but it was also a little bit because it was my only afternoon course. The professor Ortila Driga was very nice, but in my opinion was not able to convey the material in an interesting way.

Leisure

As a city, Barcelona has an incredible amount to offer. I was able to get a bike relatively at the beginning and rode around town, on the beach or wherever with my friends. As in Germany, the train is very well connected, which is why you can also take the train to visit the beautiful regions of Spain on a weekend can explore. However, this is not absolutely necessary as you never get bored in Barcelona. I would recommend going out as much as possible. At the beginning it is often said that it is advised to be very careful because of the high crime rate. I can confirm that, but I was told so often at the beginning that I thought I was going to a city full of criminals. So there should be no fear and if you are careful and keep your eyes open and don’t go into a dark alley alone in the evening, nothing should happen to you. Read more student reviews on Iamaccepted.

Conclusion

In summary, I can say that Barcelona was an incredibly good time for me that I would repeat immediately. I have really taken Barcelona to my heart and will definitely be back often. Although I suffered a bit of a culture shock from the violent independence movements, I felt safe and welcome. I envy everyone who still has the great time ahead of them!

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona 5

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (4)

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (4)

1. Application process

To apply to UAB, I used the help of the free placement agency MicroEDU. You can request information material in advance on the website and get advice on your favorite universities by email or telephone. At first I wasn’t sure where to go for the semester abroad, so I asked the MicroEDU Team for advice on the semester abroad in the USA and Spain.It quickly became clear to me, mainly because of the lower costs, that I wanted to apply to the UAB. The agency has really been of great help here. I always received a detailed answer very quickly to all questions and uncertainties about the university, the application or the choice of course. When you have decided on a university, you first fill out the complete application documents (general application form, English résumé, transcript of records, passport photo…) and send them to MicroEDU in Münster, observing the application deadline. The application is checked here and then forwarded to the UAB if it is complete and correct.

Basically, you have two options at UAB. Either you apply for the normal Study Abroad Program, which takes place at the main Bellaterra campus and in Spanish, or you decide, like me, for the pre-established Study Abroad Program. This is explicitly aimed at internationals, ie the courses are held in English and only at 2 separate campuses in the city.

I received the confirmation from the UAB after just 2 weeks. As soon as a deposit of 500 euros has been made, you will receive a binding confirmation and the study place is guaranteed. You should do this as quickly as possible to secure his place, however, as the UAB only a limited number of study places has

Through MicroEDU, a contact list of all other MicroEDU exchange students in Barcelona was also published, as well as a Facebook group for previous exchanges.

2. Finding accommodation

The search for an apartment in Barcelona is a little different than in Germany. Renting a room, for example, is possible at much shorter notice, so that you can only look for an apartment on site. In general, you have the choice of applying for a dormitory or a host family, or renting a room.Since I previously lived in Bonn, where the rental prices are also very high, the rental prices were comparable for me. Anyone who spends 400 – 500 euros for a room in a shared apartment will usually find a good room. There are also some rooms around 300 euros, but they are often further outside or are very small. In addition, interior rooms are also often rented in Spain, ie the room faces the inner courtyard or hallway, so there is no window to the outside. These are then usually a little cheaper.

I decided to look for a room in a shared apartment. After reading the recommendation in many field reports to look for the apartment on site, I decided to look in Barcelona first. However, I can say in advance that you should have strong nerves to search on site! Most Germans have already looked for their room in Germany. Most Americans stayed in student dormitories or home stays. As a student residence, the RESA houses should be very good. If you apply in good time and secure a place in the student dormitory, you will definitely save yourself a lot of work looking for an apartment. However, I was too late with my request, so I decided to look for a shared apartment.

I booked a pension for the first 3 nights. Here I can highly recommend the Pension Villanueva on Placa Real. There are many websites, such as Idealista and Easy Piso, where you can find rooms. You can also find a lot of recruitment agencies, but they charge high agency fees. I got to know some who had booked their room in advance through an agency and were also satisfied.

On the first day I wrote to a lot of landlords on Easy Piso and Idealista and only got back sporadic answers. I can definitely recommend calling the landlord directly in order to arrange a viewing appointment immediately and not have to wait for an answer by email. So you can better plan the viewing day. I was able to look at some of the rooms and unfortunately had to accept some disappointments. In the first 4 days there was nothing suitable, so that, to my desperation, I had to spend another night in the guesthouse. You should plan a week for looking for an apartment on site and don’t rent a room out of fear that you don’t like. In general there is no housing shortage in Barcelona, but the demand is particularly high at the end of August / beginning of September, as many students and internationals are looking for a room during this time. You should be prepared for the fact that very often you only get to know the landlord and don’t know who else lives in the shared apartment. In addition, in Barcelona, ​​every additional square meter that is not used is often rented out. This means that very small rooms à la Harry Potter are often rented out. For example, I visited a 4 square meter room. Often families also rent out a single room in their apartment, which is usually not immediately apparent.

In general, you should also lower your standard a bit, as the apartments in Barcelona are often very outdated. In the course of the semester, some of my friends also had to deal with bed bugs, especially in the typical Erasmus apartments, this is a common problem. If you find a room that you really like, it is best to agree to it directly or during the day.Most landlords rent out the apartments on the “first come, first serve” principle. Fortunately, it worked for me on the 5th day and I found a room in a great location in Eixample, near the Plaza Universitats (wanted for a flat share). Unfortunately, this was an interior room, which was absolutely okay for the short stay of 4 months. You are always on the move a lot and apart from that, my flat share was great and I felt comfortable from the first day. I lived with a young Spanish couple and another German. If you have the chance, look for a flat share with Spaniards. So you get a lot more of the culture and can even speak Spanish.

Even if it took a lot of nerve to look for my room on site, I don’t regret this decision. In the end I found a great flat share that was also very central. When looking for an apartment, I had many interesting encounters and experienced the cultural differences directly. I also got to know a very good friend, with whom I always did a lot throughout the semester.

Others, who were looking for their room from Germany, were sometimes negatively surprised by the condition, the location of the apartment or the flatmates upon arrival. In the worst case, you even end up with a fraudster.

However, if you decide to search locally, you should take enough time and not put yourself under pressure. Everyone I met who was looking for their room in Barcelona found a room within a week.

3. Description of the university / faculty

The Autonomous University of Barcelona is a state university founded in 1968. Their main campus, Bellaterra, is around 30 km from Barcelona. In total, over 50,000 students study at the UAB. 77 different courses are offered.

Internationals who complete the “Pre-established study abroad program” do not study together with the locals at the Bellaterra Campus. The program is aimed exclusively at internationals. In small groups of a maximum of 30 people, courses from the fields of Business, Economics, Politics, Mediterranean Studies and Spanish can be chosen. Most of the students come from the USA or Germany. However, there were also a few Dutch, Belgians, Canadians and Koreans in my courses. There are 2 different campuses in Barcelona itself for the program : the Eixample campus and the Sant Pau campus.

The Eixample Campus is located in the heart of the city, in the beautiful Eixample district. Mainly the economic courses and some language courses take place here. All my lectures took place here exclusively. Unfortunately, this is not a classic campus, but a building that is reminiscent of a residential building. The perfect location, in the immediate vicinity of Passeig de Gracias, the magnificent boulevard Barcelona makes up for it. The lunch break or a longer break between lectures is ideal to go into town for a little shopping tour or to pay a visit to one of the numerous cafes and restaurants.

The Sant Pau campus is a bit further out, but is also well connected to the metro network. The campus is beautiful and a lot bigger than the one in Eixample. It is an old building belonging to the Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau. In contrast to the Eixample Campus, the Sant Pau Campus also has a library with PCs and a small cafe. Unfortunately, I didn’t have a course here, because the arts and social sciences are the main subjects here. However, some fellow students had courses at both campuses. Thanks to the good metro connection, these can be reached quickly within 20 minutes.

The introductory event at the beginning of the semester also takes place on the Sant Pau Campus. But you should definitely go to the Sant Pau Campus for a day and look around. Then you can also pay a visit to the magnificent main part of the Hospital Santa Creu i Sant Pau. The building is really impressive. You can learn a lot about history here and you can also visit some of the former hospital rooms.

4. Description of the region / city

Barcelona is just great !!! The city has so much to offer that you can never get bored.

The Catalan city with its Mediterranean buildings simply has charm. If you have seen the impressive main sights, such as the Gaudi houses, Passeig de Gracia, Park Guell or the Sagrada Familia, there are still so many great squares, streets and alleys to discover. I also often just strolled through the city and let the beautiful buildings work on me.

The Bunkers del Carmel were a highlight for me. These are located on a mountain on the outskirts of the city near Park Guell. Especially in the summer months it was great to sit here and enjoy the sunset and great views of the whole city. In the city there are 2 other mountains with great views. On the one hand the mountain Montjuic, where the Castell de Montjuic is located and to which the cable car also goes. The “Brunch in the Parc” electrical festival takes place here once a month during the summer months. An excursion should definitely also go to the Tibidabo mountain. There is a small amusement park right at the top. The park is not particularly spectacular, but the view and the flair are unique.

Due to the Mediterranean climate, Barcelona offers a very high quality of life. Most of the life takes place outside. In the first two months in particular, I was almost only in my flat to sleep.

When I arrived in Barcelona at the end of August, it was still very warm, so I spent a lot of time on the beach, especially in August and September. During the main tourist season, the Barceloneta beach is unfortunately very overcrowded. However, if you drive to the beach sections of Mar Bella, this is much more pleasant. I can also highly recommend taking the bus to Gava Mar, near Castelldefels, as you will find a really great and spacious beach here.

Until mid-October the temperatures are still pretty summery and even in November there were always a few really warm days. In general, the sun shines very often, which has had a very positive effect on my mood and entrepreneurship. Barcelona also has a lot to offer in culinary terms. There are so many cafés, restaurants and tapas bars that unfortunately you cannot try all of them in such a short time. The Spaniards usually go out a lot, so full restaurants and bars are perfectly normal even during the week.

Barcelona has a very good nightlife with many bars and clubs, which thanks to the countless guest lists of the promoters as an international, you can almost always get in for free. At the beginning of September, for example, Zedd was in the Opium and, thanks to the guest list, you didn’t have to pay any admission here either. The beach clubs (Opium, Pacha, Shoko..) are also very popular with tourists, so they are almost always very full. But there are so many other party locations that you should definitely try out. In addition, there are many free dinners in the clubs, especially at the beginning of the semester, where you can eat tapas for free and then party.

There are also a lot of cozy bars, especially in the beautiful El Born district. There are always cool events taking place, such as Stand Up Comedy Nights or Magic Mic Nights. I also went to a language exchange a couple of times, where you had the opportunity to talk to locals and improve your Spanish. I can only recommend this to everyone because you only study with internationals at the university.

“La Merce” will take place in Barcelona at the end of September. This is the Fiesta Mayor, the largest city festival. Over 500 events take place here over several days. These include the typical program items such as the impressive and well-known human towers, “Castellers”, and the fire games “Correfoc”. There are also several fireworks and concerts. The highlight of the event in 2016 was the Manu Chao concert.

Due to the popularity of Barcelona, ​​you should definitely check out what concerts are taking place. For example, I was at a Red Hot Chilli Peppers, which was a special highlight of the semester abroad for me. Should you ever need a break from Barcelona, ​​the surrounding cities are definitely worth a trip.I can highly recommend Sitges, Girona and Tarragona, which can be easily reached by train in under an hour. Sitges is a very cute town with lots of little boutiques and a really great beach. Girona is particularly attractive due to the historical, medieval old town and Tarragona is also highly recommended because of the historic city center with Roman monuments. A trip to the Montserrat mountains with some very adventurous hiking trails should not be missed either.

As you can see, Barcelona offers endless opportunities to spend your free time that you can hardly grasp in such a short time!

5. Description of the courses taken

I have chosen a total of 3 business courses, which I credit for my major in “International Management”. I also took a Spanish course. Each course takes place twice a week (Mon / Wed, or Tue / Thu) for 100 minutes each. The first course starts at 9 a.m. and the last one ends at 7:20 p.m. There is always a lunch break from 12:40 p.m. to 1:40 p.m. There is also a break of 20 minutes between each course. Friday is generally always free. The courses are selected when applying before the start of the semester. However, in the first few weeks in the add and drop period, you still have the option of adding courses, or deselecting and exchanging courses. However, this only works if there are still free places in the course.

However, I did not take advantage of this because I was satisfied with the choice of course.

On Mondays and Wednesdays I only had Crosscultural Management from 5:45 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. and on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9:00 a.m. to 5:20 p.m. Along with the lunch break, however, I was free from 12:40 p.m. to 3:40 p.m. and was always able to make good use of the time to do my homework or to test out the cafes in the area.

Crosscultural Management

Crosscultural Management aims to increase awareness and competence in dealing with other cultures. In terms of content, Hofstede’s cultural dimensions are dealt with. The first topic was, for example, Individualism vs. Collectivisim. The different extremes are defined and explained with examples. You learn the different characteristics of each dimension and then you can classify different countries in terms of their characteristics. Jean Philippe has a lot of experience in dealing with different cultures and always brings a lot of interesting practical examples, as well as helpful information on dealing with foreign cultures in everyday life and in the working world. His anecdotes, some of which are very funny, are always very entertaining and varied. In addition to the theoretical part, articles are worked on and discussed and there are 1 – 2 group work in almost every teaching unit. In addition, texts on “Cultural Metaphors” were distributed, which were worked on in groups of three. In a 30-minute presentation, each group should present their cultural metaphor. The presentation should have the character of a discussion, such as the simulation of a TV show. In the last third of the semester, there were 10-minute individual presentations on previously edited texts. Both presentations together make up 20% of the overall grade.

There is no midterm exam in this course, so the final exam makes up 40% of the overall grade. On the day of the finals, we also have to hand in a short term paper on the subject of “My personal orientation”, in which we have classified ourselves in every cultural dimension. This paper counts 20%. There is often homework, but it is not very time consuming. This and the oral participation then make up the remaining 20% ​​of the overall grade.

I really enjoyed the course. It was very interesting to receive in-depth information about the cultural differences and to become aware of the characteristics of one’s own culture. I have learned a lot of new and interesting things that help me in everyday life and in my professional life. The discussions in the multicultural group were particularly interesting.

The workload for the course is well distributed and therefore never particularly high. The preparation of the presentations was the most time-consuming, but also counted the least afterwards.

Managerial Skills for International Business

Managerial skills at Maydo were also very interesting and varied. Maydo studied psychology and has since worked in management positions in several companies. She brings very interesting examples from the HR department. With her honest manner, she always provides entertainment in the course. Thematically, topics related to management and leadership are dealt with, e.g. characteristics of a good manager. A total of 16 different topics were worked out, eg leadership, time management, emotional intelligence, foreign assignments with employees … The various topics were very varied and were worked out interactively. Maydo uploads various documents to a dropbox. A script is available for every topic, as well as some articles, some of which are worked out as homework or in groups. Various scenes from films are also analyzed for almost every topic. The theories and concepts learned are to be applied here. Maydo also includes many outdoor activities and team building measures that take place again and again in the neighboring park and ensure confused looks and lots of fun.

As a team building measure at the beginning of the semester, Maydo organized an “Activity at the Beach” day. Here everyone could register voluntarily for 10 euros and play beach volleyball and soccer on Gava Mar beach (approx. 20 minutes by bus from Placa Espanya), as well as go paddle boating.

There is a midterm exam and a final exam in this course, each making up 25% of the overall grade. Getting a good grade is really very easy as it is a 15 minute test with true / false questions. However, you should always be present, as there are also many questions about the group activities and discussions and Maydo always checks the presence. The remaining 50% of the grade is made up of oral participation, homework, punctuality, work ethic and participation in group activities. Maydo is really very fair and rates very nicely.

International Marketing Strategies

This course was very chaotic, but in retrospect I really enjoyed it. I was in Chengcheng Li’s course. She is from China and has been living in Spain for some time, where she is currently doing her MBA. Since it was her first course with “real” students, otherwise she only teaches executives and professionals, she was very excited and wanted to do everything perfectly. She is really really nice and really wants us all to learn something for life. Instead, she likes to talk about her personal experiences and about setting up her own company, or about the economy and attitudes in China. I always found these real insights very interesting. Chengcheng is highly motivated and is trying the course for oneInspiring marketing career. The not particularly good knowledge of English is not an obstacle, with hands and feet and many new words and grammar creations, Chencheng raves about marketing and entertains the course very much. Thematically, however, the structure and the concept were missing in the course. Some in the course had very little previous marketing knowledge. Chengcheng then completely overturned her initially planned concept in the first hour and came up with a new one within 5 minutes. She has prepared a script with marketing topics for each lesson, but always liked to wander quickly and spontaneously put in a discussion or had a “very good idea” from group work, which was then brought forward. The end of the course always came very suddenly for them, so that we sometimes did longer or postponed the content to the next unit, which was then again similar. In groups or as homework, some case studies on interesting marketing cases were worked on, for example a case study on the “brand” Lady Gaga.In International Marketing Studies we did not write a midterm or a final. At the beginning, groups were drawn that had to give 4 presentations in the semester. Chengcheng always let us know at very short notice when the presentations would take place and never gave us a structure. Since the majority of the course participants came from the USA and the Americans traveled through Europe almost every weekend, most of the presentations were then prepared at the last minute. The preparation was really always a mess. Chengcheng’s rigorous evaluation and high expectations came as a huge shock to many after the initial presentation. In the course of time, however, one has adjusted to their type and approach, so that the next presentations were also much better. It was important to Chengcheng to provide us with real issues. For example, we had to develop a Louis Vuitton Christmas campaign that, thanks to Chengcheng’s good connections, was passed on to a Louis Vuitton employee who then rated it and gave us feedback. For a Project with a real estate agency for luxury properties from Barcelona Chengcheng invited them to give a lecture with us and interviews were also carried out so that we should see them as our “customers” and develop a concept for them. The 4 group presentations each counted 10%. Participation and attendance were not included in the final grade. The last presentation was a solo presentation that counted 60%. But since the end of the semester came very suddenly again and it was impossible for 30 course participants to present their concept, Chengcheng changed the concept once again. Everyone had to send her the presentation and write it down and could present it voluntarily for 5 minutes. The presentation was therefore not rated at all and only led to additional points.

As you can see, this course was very chaotic and I could write a novel here. Due to the practical relevance, the interesting projects and personal contributions from Chengcheng, the course was nevertheless instructive and I was able to take a lot with me. Chengcheng is genuinely interested in getting students excited about working in marketing. After Christmas, for example, she sent an email to the entire course with an offer for an internship at Louis Vuitton.

Spanish Elementary

You can choose either the 45-hour Spanish course or the 90-hour course that takes place every day. I chose the 45-hour one.

An online test must be completed beforehand, in which the previous knowledge is checked in order to determine the language level and then to be placed in the correct course. If you have no previous knowledge, the test is skipped and you will be placed in the Spanish beginner course. Since I already had Spanish in school, I was, to my amazement, placed in the Low Intermediate (B1 level). I always had Spanish on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1:40 p.m. to 3:20 p.m. But it quickly became apparent that the test was not that accurate. In the first Spanish lessons, the lecturers carry out a few more tests to determine the level of the students. After that, a number of students switched to another Spanish course, including myself. I was recommended to change the Spanish course to level A2.But since we were only 6 people in total, this course was really very intensive and I was able to definitely improve my Spanish.We stuck to the book very closely, but also did a lot of speaking exercises. We had several Spanish tests during the semester in which reading comprehension, listening comprehension, written expression and speaking skills were tested. All of this flowed into the final grade along with participation, homework and attendance. What counted most was the final exam, which consisted of a grammar, a written and an oral part. The final exam was definitely doable and really not difficult. Some of my friends, some of whom were even in a Spanish course with 30 participants, did not find it particularly effective and were very annoyed in retrospect, mainly because of the high financial cost (1000 €). Since I really wanted to improve my Spanish, I am glad that I chose the course. The course is actually quite expensive, so I am convinced that for the money you can certainly take a more intensive Spanish course with another provider.

6. Comparison to our courses

Compared to the courses in Germany, the courses in Barcelona were even more practice-oriented. Much less material was dealt with, but it was always enriched with interesting practical experience and tips from the lecturers. I found the level of my events to be lower than in Germany. However, some courses, such as International Business and Emerging Markets, are said to have been more demanding and complex. The effort in my courses was low and definitely feasible. I never sat on my homework for long and only had a midterm exam. The preparation for the finals was the most complex, but definitely not to be compared with the exam preparation in Germany.I still had a lot of free time and I wasn’t stressed about exams. The small courses and the classroom setting made you feel more like you were in school. The fact that there was homework, the oral participation and attendance were assessed, reminded even more of the school days and was initially a big change for most Germans. The courses are all held in English, so you should have a good command of English in order to be able to follow the course content.The events in Germany are much more theoretical and science-oriented. Some theories learned in Barcelona, ​​especially in the field of psychology, sounded very questionable to me in terms of their empirical foundation and would certainly not have been taught in Germany. The Study Abroad Program is particularly good with regard to the development of intercultural skills and cultural understanding. I really got a lot of insights into different cultures and my desire to travel and interest in foreign cultures was increased even more. My course combination was very varied and I was very satisfied with my courses and lecturers.

7. Statement of costs and financing options

A semester abroad represents a high financial expense, which is a deterrent at first. One has but definitely some ways the costs reduce or get grants. At first I really wanted to do my semester abroad in the USA, but that was way too expensive for me, so I decided to go to Spain. I have not regretted the decision!

The expenses for home and leisure are in their own hands, so it is difficult to say how much each individual ultimately spends. The same applies to excursions and trips. In general, food prices are to be equated with those in Germany. Going out is about as expensive as in Germany.

I went on a couple of trips during the semester. This is a good idea, because Friday is always free. So I went to San Sebastian, Valencia and Rome during the semester and went on a few day trips (Girona, Tarragona, Sitges, Montserrat…). As a result, I spent a lot on travel. Since I went out a lot more often and wanted to really discover the city of Barcelona, ​​I also spent more on free time than in Germany.

In general, however, you should also take the time and enjoy life in Barcelona. Especially the non-Europeans were in a different place almost every weekend and therefore often did not get much of the Spanish culture.

Here is a rough list of the costs:

Deposit + 3 courses + Spanish course 3010 €
apartment 400 – 500 € monthly
flight Approx. 150 €
Monthly Expenses (free time, shopping, eating, going out, traveling) Depending on your own lifestyle

Even if the semester was a high financial expense, the experience was simply priceless!

Funding options:

It is advisable to apply for BAFÖG abroad. The assessment limit is a lot higher here and the BAFÖG office pays the tuition fee up to € 4600 in full (without repayment) and you also receive a monthly amount. Unfortunately I didn’t get one.

There are a few scholarships that one can apply for. However, you should inform yourself in good time, as the application deadline for some scholarships expires well in advance.

You can apply for the DAAD scholarship through the university, where you will receive a travel allowance. Usually everyone gets this.

In some cases, the university also offers free places that you can apply for.

I applied for the MicroEDU Scholarship and would recommend anyone going abroad with MicroEDU to do so. A scholarship of 1000 euros is awarded per department. In the application, you should present your motivation and expectations of the course in a medium of your choice. There are no limits to creativity. I already had a lot of fun processing the application and triggered a huge motivation kick. Once you get inside yourself and really become aware of what you are hoping for from your stay abroad, you can hardly wait for it to finally start. The effort has paid off and I was thrilled to receive the MicroEDU scholarship for my department.

Before the semester abroad, a telephone interview was done in which I introduced myself and disclosed my reasons for the semester abroad, as well as my expectations and my plans to use the money. This was in an article in which the semester scholarship presented, were published on the MicroEDU page. Read more student reviews on Jibin123.

Another interview was carried out in the semester in which I reported on my previous experiences.

8. Professional and personal experience

The semester abroad in Barcelona has brought me a lot, both professionally and personally. I can recommend everyone to take the chance of a semester abroad. I enjoyed every day of the semester abroad to the full and would have had no problem staying any longer!

For me the time is one of the best of my life. It was a great experience to experience the Spanish culture.The Spaniards are mostly very friendly and open and enjoy their life much more than most Germans. Punctuality and the attitude to work are frightening at first, but you learn very quickly to get involved with the new culture. For most Spaniards, family and friends take priority over work and luxury. Going out and spending time with loved ones is more important than working all day. I found out for myself that you should definitely take time for yourself and your friends and family, rather than career and work, and have been living much more consciously ever since. After you have successfully mastered situations such as looking for an apartment or some communication problems, this has a positive effect on self-confidence and self-confidence. Before starting the semester abroad, I had some doubts and fear of being homesick or of not being able to cope with the situation in a foreign country. These were completely unfounded. I really haven’t been homesick in the whole time and have always felt good.When there were problems, I met so many helpful people. Since then, I have trusted myself a lot more and look forward to further stays abroad or longer trips.

Since the “Pre-established Study Abroad Program” is very international, I found it very interesting to get to know other cultures besides Spanish. For example, I made friends with a Korean woman and always found it very interesting to learn more about the way of life and attitudes in South Korea. Things that we take for granted are by no means taken for granted in other cultures. You definitely learn to deal with other cultures, which is particularly advantageous in the age of globalization.

I was very satisfied with my choice of course and thus had very varied, different courses.

The lecturers were always able to bring many practical examples with them and give us some tips for our working life.

I can only recommend everyone to leave their comfort zone, think outside the box and gain a foothold in a foreign country. Even if it is difficult at first, there are so many great experiences and challenges waiting for you. Those who master all of this can only grow personally, professionally and culturally and broaden their horizons.

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona 4

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (3)

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (3)

We became aware of MicroEDU through a friend who had already completed a semester abroad with MicroEDU. The application process and the submission of the documents were extremely quick and easy. Of particular note is that getting a contact of MicroEDU was available to us to answer questions and help us. The MicroEDU team also offered us to take care of matters such as changing course, which we did not have to take advantage of.

Accommodation

I traveled with two fellow students from Fulda. We agreed in advance to go looking for an apartment in Barcelona so that we could visit it. I would advise everyone to do the same, as we noticed on site that the images on real estate websites like Idealista often do not correspond to reality. We arrived at the end of August and rented a central apartment through Airbnb for the first week. That week we looked extensively for apartments. The offer is extremely large, so it shouldn’t be a problem to find an apartment upon arrival. In retrospect, the apartment we found turned out to be a real stroke of luck. Three of us paid1200 euros per month, including fixed costs, for an apartment which was only one block away from the shopping street La Rambla and which was also modernly furnished. From the stories of other students at the UAB, however, we realized that we were extremely lucky with the apartment. Read more student reviews on Liuxers.

Studies

The lectures started in the first week of September with an introductory event in which the students were welcomed and the basic things about the city and the university were suggested to them. We chose the courses for the semester in advance. So we decided on:

  • International Marketing Strategies
  • Managerial Skills for International Business
  • Strategic Behavior in Business and Economics
  • The creative economy

On the whole, we were completely satisfied with the courses we chose. In International Marketing Strategies, however, similar to the course The Creative Economy, the workload is relatively high, as there are many presentations and projects to be worked on over the entire semester. However, I have to say that the lecturer in The Creative Economy stuck in my mind with his enthusiastic and funny manner. In Strategic Behavior in Business and Economics, it is all about probability calculations, this course is likely meant a heavy workload for anybody. Probably the lowest workload was in the Managerial Skills for International Business course. This course is characterized by role play and outdoor activities. The exams in general are much easier than at German colleges and universities, and you hardly have to study for these exams. However, there are projects, homework or presentations in every course that have to be worked on bit by bit over the entire period. Since each of these small tasks is assessed, it is almost impossible to fail a course.

Leisure

Of course, free time should not be neglected in a semester abroad. Barcelona offers an extremely wide range of activities that you can do in your free time. Otherwise, Barcelona offers a rather unique lifestyle, as the city only wakes up around noon. Also, unlike in Germany, the nightlife doesn’t start until after midnight. The clubs on the beach like Shoko or Opium are extremely touristy, so look for other local clubs. One should definitely see the Bunkers del Carmel as a sight. It’s best to take something to eat and drink with you and enjoy the magnificent view. For everyone who likes fishThe best paella in town can be found at the Olympic harbor in the restaurant La Fonda del Port Olímpic. Furthermore, it is definitely worth going to a FC Barcelona game while Messi is still on the pitch. (Live Messi is even more blatant). I can also recommend trips to the Costa Brava, these areas are not as crowded as Barcelona and offer beautiful beaches.

To get from A to B, it is best to use the metro and buy a T-Jove ticket for around 80 euros at the beginning of your stay. You can then drive indefinitely for ninety days. The ticket is definitely worth it, as a ten ticket costs around 11 euros. This means that you can use the metro for almost the entire duration of your stay.

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona 3

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (2)

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (2)

Planning (application)

Through my compulsory study abroad in Barcelona, ​​I hoped for extensive personal and professional development. In addition to consolidating my Spanish skills, I mainly wanted to learn more about the Spanish and Catalan culture, which was very possible despite a very international study environment with many internationally renowned universities. The Mediterranean climate, the location directly on the Mediterranean Sea and the multitude of monuments and sights also convinced me to spend a semester abroad in Barcelona. Since the Trier University of Applied Sciences has no partnership with the UAB, I applied as a freemover. MicroEDU acted as a free agent and contact person. It was meComprehensive information and helpful advice were made available, which made the application process relatively easy. In addition to good academic performance, a language test was also necessary (in my case TOEFL iBT) in order to be accepted into the UAB’s Pre-Established Program. Read more student reviews on Mcat-test-centers.

Preparation

NEVER

Although I had never been to Spain before my stay in Barcelona, ​​I went into my first semester abroad relatively unprepared. Due to the advantages of the European Union, this wasn’t a big disadvantage either, as I didn’t need a visa. However, since I planned to be in Spain for more than three months within six monthsTo stay, however, it was necessary to acquire a so-called NIE (Número de Identidad de Extranjero), a foreigner identification number. This is also required for the purchase of various services such as the bike rental system or the T-Jove of the metro in Barcelona. If you have enough lead time, you can apply to a Spanish consulate in Germany, which avoids uncomfortable waiting times or complicated official calls in Spanish. In addition, appointments in Barcelona are only given on Mondays at exactly 8:00 a.m. on the website of the immigration authorities, which causes a large rush of only a few appointments each week and several attempts may be necessary. Since the NIE theoretically has to be applied for by all foreign students in Spain (which is far from the reality),

Accommodation

Finding accommodation in Barcelona is entirely possible, but depending on personal preferences, it can be nerve-wracking. Many of my fellow students flew to Spain one to two weeks in advance to look for accommodation on site. This promises a higher degree of certainty about the correctness of the landlord’s information, but is not recommended without sufficient knowledge of Spanish. Many landlords do not respond to emails or messages at all on popular portals such as Idealista, which is why fluent communication in Spanish over the phone is necessary. Although most of the locals in Barcelona have a relatively good command of English, this is by no means the case for all Spaniards.

I personally booked my apartment through HousingAnywhere and RentRoomBarcelona, ​​which I can only recommend. Due to the very central location in Eixample right next to a UAB campus, my accommodation was relatively expensive, which is why I would recommend other areas to others. Safe and cheaper areas with good locations are Gracia, Poble Sec or El Born. I would rather avoid Gotic, the old town of Barcelona, ​​due to the tourist crowds and the lack of quiet at night. I can only advise against an apartment in El Raval, one of the more popular nightlife areas in Barcelona. Although I really enjoy being a guest in one of the many different bars and restaurantswas there, it can be very dangerous there at night. Many foreign students from my circle of friends underestimated the potential dangers of Barcelona, ​​which they unfortunately often had to pay for with the loss of their valuables. Other helpful portals when looking for accommodation are ResaHousing, Spotahome or Idealista. I obtained my international health insurance from ERGO travel insurance, which offered the best price-performance ratio in comparison.

Situation on site

University

Through MicroEDU, I was relatively well informed about the requirements and courses on site. I also got access to a WhatsApp group in which all students who came to UAB via MicroEDU were included. This made it possible to make initial contacts before the start of the semester. One week before the start of the lecture, there was an introductory event on the Sant Pau campus of the UAB, at which all participants of the Study Abroad program were present. Since I received my “timetable” before I left for Spain, we were only briefly informed about the UAB and Barcelona itself in order to have a good start to the semesterto enable. Unfortunately, this event was kept relatively short, with many students criticizing the lack of networking opportunities. As the pre-established program only takes place on the Eixample and Sant Pau campuses, a visit to the main campus in Bellaterra was not necessary. Leisure and sports facilities were only available on the main campus, and the library in Sant Pau is relatively small and does not offer many workplaces. The library of the Pompeu Fabra University is particularly recommended here.

Courses

I took the courses in Managing Services, Human Resource Management, E-Commerce and Online Businesses and Spanish A2, which I can thoroughly recommend. Thanks to the project-based structure of the courses, you can quickly come into contact with other international students and develop new content yourself. Submission deadlines were divided into a mid-term and a final week. By constantly working in groups, the workload is felt to be higher during the semester, but this avoids a nerve-wracking exam phase.

Life

I made social contacts mainly through living in a shared apartment and ESN, which is why I definitely recommend purchasing the ESN card at the beginning of the semester. The Erasmus Student Network offers many discounts for students, such as cheaper flights including luggage with RyanAir, discounts on bus or train tickets and reduced prices for drinks in various bars. ESN also offers various excursions into the surrounding area of ​​Barcelona, which are difficult to achieve without your own or rented car. An incredibly cheap and trustworthy car rental company in Barcelona for us was Centauro Rental (at the airport!), With which we never had any problems.

A major criticism of my study abroad in Barcelona, ​​however, is the large number of tourists in Barcelona, ​​which brings the city to its limits. Many residents also seem annoyed by tourists who are causing apartment prices in Barcelona to rise exponentially through portals like AirBnB. In addition, it was sometimes difficult to improve my Spanish skills, as many people also consider foreign students to be tourists and therefore switch to English relatively quickly. Due to the Catalan culture in and around Barcelona, ​​the spread of the Catalan language, which is preferred to Spanish in many places, should not be underestimated.

The fact that Barcelona is a tourist city can be seen above all from the apartment prices. I paid € 650 a month for my exterior room in La Dreta de l’Eixample, which was relatively simply furnished. When looking for an apartment, it should be noted that in Spain a distinction is made between exterior and interior rooms. Exterior rooms have a window with daylight, while interior rooms usually have a window into the hallway or a shaft inside the building. You can shop cheaply at Aldi, Lidl or Mercadona, which can be compared in price with the discounters in Germany. Carrefour, a French supermarket chain, is roughly at an Edeka or Rewe price level, but rarely available in the city center.

Go out

Going out in Barcelona is possible in many ways, but I would advise against tourist traps. Under no circumstances can I recommend the clubs and bars on the beach (for example Pacha or Opium), as the prices and the chance of stolen valuables are both very high. Recommended areas for bars are Raval or Gotic, and Poble Sec in particular offers almost unlimited possibilities for tapas. Poble Nou is often ignored by many students and tourists, but with the club and concert location Razzmatazz and various bars it offers a very good opportunity to go out. Other recommended locations are above all on the Poble Espanyol site (La Terrrazza, Input, Hivernacle), Sala Apollo or the City Hall. There are also many outdoor events in summer such as Brunch in the Park or La Merce, the city festival of Barcelona that takes place in September.

Situation after return (findings)

At my university there were no problems with the recognition of the ECTS obtained abroad, as I recorded the courses and their contents beforehand with a foreign supervisor. Due to the lack of a partnership between the Trier University of Applied Sciences and the UAB, no learning agreement via Erasmus was necessary. Since two study-integrated stays abroad are mandatory in my course, I was already prepared for the international experience in previous semesters. However, it was still very exciting for me to be able to gain new experience at a university other than my home university. I have certainly been able to improve my Spanish skills and have personally taken a lot of knowledge back to Germany with me. Above all, this includes knowledge of the Catalan culture and Spanish way of life, which offers some differences compared to the German mentality. However, as soon as you get used to the initially unstructured processes, studying in Spain is highly recommended in terms of quality.

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona 2

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (1)

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (1)

Everyone is talking about Barcelona and rightly so! If you are toying with the idea of ​​spending a semester abroad in one of the hippest metropolises in Europe, then now is exactly the right time to lose yourself in the pulsating nightlife of Barcelona and explore the endless cultural offerings of one of the most traditional cities in Spain. Even if that might sound more like an advertising slogan to you, it is exactly what Barcelona can offer you. In the following experience report, I would like to tell you in chronological order about my semester abroad in Barcelona, one of the most beautiful adventures I have been able to experience so far.

1. Application

The university of my choice was the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona. A friend had previously completed his semester abroad at this university and in order to avoid possible surprises regarding the degree of difficulty of the courses, I followed his course advice. The application process is very simple and seems more of a formality. However, it is crucial to choose your courses wisely, as changing courses at a later date is possible but can only be done for academic reasons. In addition, there is a no refund policy if you should decide that you no longer want to take a course. MicroEDU also guides you through the entire application process very wellso that you submit all documents correctly and on time.

2. Choice of subjects

In retrospect, it is very important to first go deeper into your choice of subjects and ask yourself what you expect from your semester abroad in terms of free time, academic challenges and grades. Since this semester was my last semester of study, I had to pass 4 subjects of 6 CP, possibly with very good grades, but at the same time I wanted to experience as much Barcelona as possible. Read more student reviews on Toppharmacyschools.

In general, it applies to all subjects that, in principle, all German students were of the opinion that the material taught was easier than at their home universities. I think that this feeling is mainly due to a different exam structure. In contrast to German universities, where you are always tested for the entire material at the end of a semester in business courses, at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona tests are carried out at very regular intervals. Subjects such as international business and doing business in emerging markets have a clear focus on homeworks such as analyzing newspaper articles.

Every 1-2 weeks there is a small test and a lot of homework plus 1 large exam per month. Subjects such as International Economics, on the other hand, are tested in 3 large exams, which are then much more demanding, but are more reminiscent of the German examination system. Nevertheless , all lecturers are friendly to you and are interested in ensuring that you get the best possible grades if you submit and edit everything.

Another special feature is that all subjects require compulsory attendance, which can take some getting used to for German students, as the lessons are more reminiscent of school than university. In each subject, there is a fixed number of absent hours, which triggers a worsening of the final grade, and a number that automatically leads to a failure of the course. The former is determined by the respective professor, the latter by the university itself.

One course that I would like to highlight at this point is International Marketing. The lecturer is also the owner of her own marketing agency and designs really extraordinary lessons. During the semester you slip into the role of a marketing agency, which is confronted with various problems and then pitches solution concepts or marketing campaigns to its clients. Most of the customers are real companies. In our case, our pitches were rated by Louis Vuitton, Shang Xia and Habitat Barcelona, ​​among others. The main objective of the course is to develop the ability to recognize opportunities in a creative way and, above all, to become very confident in presenting. The course is very labor-intensive, but incredibly interesting and productive for anyone who wants to gain an insight into practical marketing.

3. Finding accommodation

The campus is located in the beautiful Eixample district, right in the city center. Make sure to include this in your apartment planning! After a long night, you will definitely look forward to a short distance to the university the next day. The best parts of the city are: Barrio Gotico, Raval and el Born, which together make up the Ciutat Vella. Eixample is also nice but further away from the beach, but close to the university. In the districts mentioned above, the rent for a room in a shared apartment is between € 380 and € 550. This is very expensive, but you will be able to experience almost everything, because everything from clubs, bars, restaurants to museums and the beach to shopping streets is right in front of your nose. Apartments in Barcelona are quickly taken, so it is necessary to be there in order to be able to take spontaneous viewing appointments.

I arrived 1 week before the start of university and stayed in a great hostel called Hostal paraiso in Raval. From here you look for an apartment via the Idealista platform. Ideally, prepare a universal personal request and set up a notification ticker so that you are informed about every new advertisement that goes online and meets your criteria. Experience has shown that you have a time window of approx. 2 days from publication until the shared apartment has made a selection, so you don’t have to contact old advertisements.

4. The first day

Here, the UAB reveals a real shortcoming, which has led to great irritation among the students. There is an information event on the first day, but no introductory activities. So if you don’t already start with well-known fellow students at UAB, you should make as many contacts as possible during the short time window before and after the introductory event. But do not worry, everyone is looking for a connection, which is why you can approach all other students without further ado !

5. The semester (university)

In terms of support , the UAB is really exemplary. A contact person will always be available to assist you with any questions that may arise. The online system is very simple and you can always get an overview of the number of hours you have missed and your current grades. In addition, all course materials are also made available via the online portal. The UAB puts together an all-round carefree package for you.

6. The semester (free time)

Barcelona has it all. The nightlife exists 7 days a week without exception. There is a festival every weekend in summer. Be sure to go to the Brunch im Park Events! The city is a stronghold of jazz, every evening you will find at least 5 bars where concerts take place. There are more museums in Barcelona than you can explore during your semester abroad. I’ve been around a lot but the choice of restaurants and bars is absolutely breathtaking. Go in search of the secret bar in the secret bar, which can be entered through a refrigerator in a Pastrami restaurant! And be sure to stop by the oldest bar in Barcelona and drink an absinthe. Rent a car or a scooter to explore the truly must-see places around Barcelona! Especially the beaches of the Costa Brava are amazing. I could continue the recommendations endlessly at this point, but your stay will be absolutely individual in one way or another and the only important thing here is the certainty that Barcelona will certainly not disappoint you.

Conclusion

Both in terms of university and the adventures you have experienced, Barcelona is simply a dream. The freedom to do so many things every day is just breathtaking. The university is not cheap, but it offers a setting in which you can get really good grades while you fully immerse yourself in life in Barcelona.

Study in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona 1

Las Palmas Travel Guide

Las Palmas Travel Guide

Las Palmas – City break in the Canary Islands. The capital of Gran Canaria, Las Palmas, is one of the most classic resorts in the Canary Islands.

LAS PALMAS

From the time of Columbus to the present day

Las Palmas, the capital of Gran Canaria, one of the Canary Islands, is a classic of holiday towns and a popular travel destination for both city and beach holidaymakers.

Many of Gran Canaria’s most popular resorts are located in the south of the island, amidst sand dunes. However, the northern part of the island does not remain a little overshadowed as a resort: Las Palmas to the north has not only an excellent sandy beach, but also many attractions and hiking opportunities.

The city of Las Palmas was founded as early as 1478 and became a popular tourist destination a few decades ago. Originally, the city was an important trading post and port stage, and Columbus also stopped in Las Palmas during his voyage to repair the platform. The house where Columbus is said to have lived during his visit can still be found in Las Palmas Old Town.

Today, Las Palmas is a versatile and modern holiday destination, suitable for both city and beach holidays. Las Palmas has fun for families with children and nightlife, especially on weekends. The city is also a good base for a car holiday around Gran Canaria.

The most famous attractions of Las Palmas are its old part of Vegueta and the long beach of the city Las Canteras.

Colorful houses in Las Palmas.

Colorful houses in Las Palmas

Pleasant climate all year round

Gran Canaria is an island with a diverse climate and Las Palmas is located in the green north of the island. The Canary Islands have one of the most pleasant climates in all of Spain .

In Las Palmas you can enjoy long and warm summers, which are the most popular tourist time. The warmest months in the city are July-October, when daytime temperatures average 25 degrees and rise to a maximum of 30 degrees. During the summer months, Las Palmas hardly ever rains.

Although the highest temperatures of the day remain above 20 degrees even in winter, the weather is unstable and cool, especially in January-February. Nights, especially in mid-winter, can be chilly.

Beaches and activities

In the center of Las Palmas is the five-kilometer-long Las Canteras Beach. Las Canteras is a well-kept and clean strip of sand with lots of facilities from sun loungers to eateries nearby. For children, Las Canteras offers small playgrounds and a few amusement parks for a fee.

A lover of culture will enjoy Las Palmas, especially in the old town of Vegueta. There are many museums and famous sights along the cobbled streets of the Old Town. In Vagueta, for example, Santa Ana Cathedral and Columbus House are worth a visit.

Gran Canaria is a good destination for motoring, so you should leave Las Palmas for a rental car to explore the island’s scenery. The views to the south are very different from the greenery of the central parts, so it’s worth taking at least a day trip to the sand dunes. The distances between the resorts are not large, so during the day you have time to get around the whole island.

Shopping and entertainment

For the shopper, Las Plamas offers good shopping. In terms of price level, Gran Canaria is hardly cheaper than in Finland, but a shopping tourist can still make discoveries in the shopping streets and large department stores of Las Palmas.

Las Palmas is also popular with food travelers as there are many good restaurants in the city. You can choose from a small family restaurant as well as a top-class gourmet restaurant.

The nightlife in the city is lively, especially on weekends. Las Palmas is the entertainment center of Gran Canaria, where you can spend the evening in pubs, nightclubs and salsa clubs. Las Palmas also hosts many events from concerts to carnivals. For example, the Las Palmas Carnival is celebrated in February-March.

FLIGHTS, ACCOMMODATION AND MOVEMENT IN LAS PALMA

FLIGHTS, ACCOMMODATION AND MOVEMENT IN LAS PALMA

Playa de las Canteras Beach is just outside the city center.

Good flight connections to the Canary Islands

From Finland there are good flight connections to Gran Canaria and Las Palmas. Gran Canaria Airport is one of the busiest airports in Spain and there are also direct leisure and low-cost flights.

Gran Canaria Airport is located in the east of the island, around 20 km from Las Palmas. Flights to the island cost about 200-800 euros and a direct flight takes 6-7 hours.

Las Palmas is a popular package holiday destination. Holiday trips to Las Palmas can be found in the selections of many travel agencies and it is also a popular destination for sudden departures.

Hotels and accommodation

Las Palmas is a popular tourist destination, which is why there are also many hotels in the city.

Las Palmas offers a variety of accommodation. If desired, the traveler can choose, for example, a high-quality apartment hotel or a modest and affordable hostel. There are also many family-friendly hotels in the city.

A hotel night in Las Palmas costs an average of 70-90 euros, but the cheapest accommodation is for twenty euros.

Getting around in the Canary Islands is easy

The city of Las Palmas can be reached on foot, by taxi or by local bus. A local bus trip costs 1-2 euros with a single ticket. A series ticket for ten trips costs 6-7 euros.

There are plenty of taxis in Las Palmas and taxi rides are especially cheap on short routes. However, for longer trips, you may want to use a bus.

The bus route network connecting the resorts and major villages of Gran Canaria is comprehensive and reasonably priced. A bus ride from the airport to Las Palmas, for example, costs a few euros.

Gran Canaria is a good destination for motoring, so if you feel like hiking outside Las Palmas, it’s worth taking a rental car from the airport. Many international car rental companies have an office at Gran Canaria Airport. However, it is worth booking the outing game before you go on a trip.

Las Palmas also offers excursions to the sea, as the city has ferry connections to neighboring islands. There are daily connections, for example, to Fuerteventura, a 3-hour ferry ride away, which costs around € 90 round trip. Tenerife can be reached from Las Palmas in a couple of hours and travel costs around € 50-100.

ATTRACTIONS OF LAS PALMAS

ATTRACTIONS OF LAS PALMAS

Santa Ana Cathedral is one of the most famous attractions in Las Palmas.

Casa de Colón

Casa de Colón, or Columbus House, is one of the most famous attractions in Las Palmas. According to the story, Kristoffer Columbus lived in this ornate house in 1492, from which the house takes its name. Since 1953, the house has served as a museum.

There is no entrance fee to Columbus House and its museums.

Catedral de Santa Ana

Construction of the Santa Ana Cathedral in the old town began as early as the 15th century, but it took almost 350 years to complete. Now the cathedral is a good masterpiece of Canarian architecture and the cathedral also features paintings by the archipelago’s most famous artist, Juan de Miranda. The Santa Ana Tower has great views of the coast.

The entrance fee is about 3 euros per adult. Children have free admission. An elevator ride to the lookout point of the tower costs a couple of euros.

7 Mares Diving Center

At the 7 Mares diving center, next to Las Canteras Beach, tourists can take a diving trip or course in the clear waters of Gran Canaria. Courses and excursions are organized for divers of all levels and equipment can be rented or purchased on site. Diving insurance is mandatory and can be obtained from the dive center.

The price of the diving trip with equipment rental is about 40 euros per dive.

THE BEST OF LAS PALMAS

THE BEST OF LAS PALMAS

Las Pamas is a successful beach and city break.

The best activities in Las Palmas

  1. A day at Las Canteras
  2. A tour of the Old Town
  3. Shopping
  4. Car trip around the island
  5. Diving course