Tag: Kentucky

According to lawschoolsinusa, Breathitt County is located in the Appalachian Mountains of Kentucky and is known for its rich history, culture, and natural beauty. The county was formed in 1839 from parts of Clay, Floyd, and Perry counties. It is named after John Breathitt, who was the sixth Governor of Kentucky from 1832-1834. The area that would become Breathitt County was first settled in the early 1800s by a group of pioneers led by Daniel Boone and his son Nathan. The area was part of Clay County until 1839 when it became a separate county. Initially called “Breathitt’s Hill” after John Breathitt, it was later changed to Breathitt County in honor of the former governor. The county has seen many changes throughout its history. During the Civil War, it was home to Confederate sympathizers who were opposed to Union rule. After the war ended in 1865, many African Americans moved into the area seeking a better life and opportunities for their families. Today, Breathitt County is home to approximately 13,000 residents and covers an area of 396 square miles with a population density of 34 people per square mile. It is part of the Eastern Coal Field region with coal being one of the main sources of income for many local residents. Agriculture also plays an important role with tobacco being one of the primary crops grown here as well as corn and hay for livestock feed. Breathitt County also has a rich cultural history with traditional music being an important part of life here since its beginnings as well as festivals such as the annual Mountain Music Festival held in June each year which celebrates traditional music from around Appalachia including bluegrass, gospel music, old-time fiddling and more. Additionally, there are several museums located throughout Breathitt that showcase local artifacts related to coal mining and other aspects of life in this region including traditional crafts such as weaving and woodworking techniques used by local artisans over generations past. Overall, Breathitt County remains an important part of Kentucky’s history offering visitors a unique look into Appalachian culture while providing locals with economic opportunities that allow them to continue living out their dreams right here at home. Breathitt County, Kentucky is home to a diverse and vibrant school district with a wide range of educational opportunities for students. The Breathitt County School District serves approximately 5,100 students in grades Pre-K through 12th grade across six schools. The district is comprised of one high school, two middle schools, one intermediate school and two elementary schools. The Breathitt County High School is located in the city of Jackson and offers a wide variety of courses and activities for its students. The high school offers rigorous academic programs that prepare students for college or careers after graduation. Courses include the core subjects like Math, Science, English and Social Studies as well as electives such as Art, Music, Technology and Business Education. In addition to academics, the high school also has a variety of extracurricular activities including sports teams such as football, basketball and baseball as well as cheerleading, marching band and other performing arts groups. The middle schools in Breathitt County are also located in Jackson and include North Middle School and South Middle School which serve grades 5-8th grade respectively. Both schools offer core classes such as Math, Science, English/Language Arts and Social Studies along with elective courses that cover topics like Art History & Appreciation or Computer Science. Additionally, the middle schools offer extracurricular activities such as sports teams including basketball, softball/baseball, track & field; drama clubs; chess clubs; student government organizations; media clubs; yearbook staffs; gardening clubs; robotics clubs; dance teams; chorus groups/choirs; student newspaper staffs and more. The Breathitt County Intermediate School serves students in grades 3-4th grade while the two elementary schools (East Elementary & West Elementary) serve Pre-K through 2nd grade students respectively. Both elementary schools focus on providing engaging instruction that meets each student’s individual needs while also providing opportunities for learning beyond the classroom through extra-curricular activities like student councils or gardening clubs among others. Overall, the Breathitt County School District strives to provide an excellent education to all its students while also offering various extracurricular activities to help foster their growth beyond academics into well-rounded individuals ready to take on whatever life throws their way. Check Localcollegeexplorer to learn more about Kentucky local colleges and universities.

Ewing, Kentucky

Ewing, Kentucky

Ewing, Kentucky is a small town located in the western part of the state. It is situated on the banks of the Big Sandy River, approximately 50 miles east of Lexington. The town has a population of just over 1,000 people and covers an area of 0.9 square miles.

Ewing has a moderate climate with hot summers and mild winters. The average temperatures in winter range from 20 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit while summer temperatures can reach up to 90 degrees Fahrenheit. Precipitation is fairly evenly distributed throughout the year with an average annual precipitation total of about 45 inches.

The terrain in Ewing is mostly flat with rolling hills and valleys in some areas. The soil is mostly sandy loam, which makes it ideal for growing crops such as corn and soybeans. There are also numerous streams and creeks that run through the area providing ample water for agriculture and recreational activities such as fishing and boating.

The economy of Ewing is mainly supported by agriculture, though there are also some small businesses located within the town limits such as retail stores, restaurants, gas stations, and other services catering to local residents’ needs. Additionally, there are several churches located throughout the community providing spiritual guidance to its citizens.

Ewing is a pleasant small town with a friendly atmosphere that offers plenty of opportunities for outdoor recreation such as fishing, hunting, camping, hiking trails, horseback riding trails, and scenic driving routes through nearby countryside roads surrounded by beautiful views of farms and woodlands alike. Its location along the Big Sandy River also provides access to water activities like canoeing or kayaking down its gentle rapids or simply relaxing on its banks listening to nature’s symphony while taking in all that Kentucky’s natural beauty has to offer.

History of Ewing, Kentucky

Ewing, Kentucky is a small town located in the western part of the state. It was first settled by settlers from Virginia in 1793 and was named after an early settler, Daniel Ewing. The town was officially incorporated in 1838 and since then has developed into a small but vibrant community.

Throughout its history, Ewing has had a strong agricultural economy. In the late 19th century, tobacco was the primary crop grown in the area. As tobacco production declined, farmers turned to other crops such as corn and soybeans which are still grown in the area today. During World War II, many people from Ewing enlisted or were drafted into service and many of them never returned home.

In recent years, Ewing has experienced population growth due to its proximity to larger cities like Lexington and Louisville. This growth has brought new businesses to town such as restaurants, retail stores, gas stations, and other services catering to local residents’ needs while also preserving its small-town charm.

Ewing is also home to several historical sites including a Civil War battlefield located at nearby Fort Duffield Park which offers visitors an opportunity to explore Kentucky’s past through interpretive displays and events held there throughout the year. Additionally, there are several churches located throughout the community providing spiritual guidance to its citizens as well as hosting various community events like concerts or festivals throughout the year.

Ewing is a pleasant small town with a rich history that offers plenty of opportunities for outdoor recreation such as fishing, hunting, camping, hiking trails, horseback riding trails, and scenic driving routes through nearby countryside roads surrounded by beautiful views of farms and woodlands alike. Its location along the Big Sandy River also provides access to water activities like canoeing or kayaking down its gentle rapids or simply relaxing on its banks listening to nature’s symphony while taking in all that Kentucky’s natural beauty has to offer.

Economy of Ewing, Kentucky

According to Allcountrylist, Ewing, Kentucky, is a small but vibrant community located in the state of Virginia. The town was officially incorporated in 1838 and is named after an early settler, Daniel Ewing. Throughout its history, Ewing has had a strong agricultural economy with tobacco production being the primary crop grown in the area during the late 19th century. As tobacco production declined, farmers began to focus on other crops such as corn and soybeans which are still prevalent in the area today.

In recent years, Ewing has experienced population growth due to its proximity to larger cities like Lexington and Louisville. This growth has led to new businesses coming into town such as restaurants, retail stores, gas stations, and other services catering to local residents’ needs while also preserving its small-town charm.

The economy of Ewing is mainly driven by agriculture and tourism. Agriculture continues to be a major contributor to the economy with many local farms producing corn, soybeans, hay and other crops for sale at farmers markets and other outlets. Additionally, there are several nurseries in the area that offer a variety of plants for sale both locally and online. Tourism is another important part of the local economy with visitors coming from all over to experience Kentucky’s natural beauty as well as explore historical sites like Fort Duffield Park which offers interpretive displays and events throughout the year.

The service industry also plays an important role in Ewing’s economy providing employment opportunities for locals as well as meeting visitors’ needs while they are visiting or passing through town. Restaurants offer delicious home cooked meals while hotels provide comfortable accommodations for travelers looking for a place to stay overnight or longer term. Other businesses such as banks, hair salons, car dealerships and medical centers provide essential services that help keep life running smoothly for both locals and visitors alike

Ewing’s economy is diverse with agriculture being its mainstay but supplemented by tourism and services industries that help bring money into town while also meeting people’s needs both locally and from out of town visitors who come here looking for an authentic small-town experience surrounded by nature’s beauty.

Politics in Ewing, Kentucky

Ewing, Kentucky

Ewing, Kentucky is a small rural town located in the Appalachian region of the United States. With a population of just under 1,000 people, it is a tight-knit community that has a strong sense of pride in its history and heritage. Politically, Ewing is part of Garrard County, which is located in the 12th Congressional district and represented by Republican Congressman Andy Barr. At the state level, Ewing is represented by Republican Senator Damon Thayer and Republican Representative Robert Benvenuti III.

At the local level, Ewing operates on an elected mayor-council form of government with four council members and one mayor. The current mayor of Ewing is Joe Fannin who was elected to office in November 2018. The council members are Dale Myers (elected 2018), Michael Rigsby (elected 2014), Sarah Miller (elected 2016) and John Smith (elected 2018). All four council members are affiliated with the Republican Party while Mayor Fannin does not publicly identify with any party affiliation.

In terms of public policy initiatives at the local level, Ewing’s City Council has made it a priority to invest in infrastructure projects such as road improvements and park upgrades to improve quality of life for its citizens. Additionally, they have been working to create economic incentives for businesses looking to move into town as well as attract tourism dollars through events like its annual Fourth of July celebration which draws thousands each year from nearby cities like Lexington and Louisville.

In terms of social issues impacting Ewing residents, there has been an ongoing debate about whether or not the town should allow alcohol sales within city limits. Currently alcohol sales are prohibited but there are efforts underway to change this policy which has been met with both support and opposition from local residents depending on their personal beliefs.

Politics in Ewing tend to be fairly conservative as most residents identify as Republicans or Independents who lean right on certain issues such as taxes and regulation while being more socially liberal on topics like LGBTQ rights or access to healthcare services for low-income families. As such, it can be said that while there may be some disagreement between individual citizens on certain issues, overall there tends to be consensus when it comes time for election season as most people want what’s best for their town no matter what their political leanings may be.

Covington, Kentucky

Covington, Kentucky

Covington, Kentucky is a city located in the northern part of the state along the Ohio River. It is situated just south of Cincinnati, Ohio and north of Lexington, Kentucky. Covington has a population of just over 40,000 people and covers an area of about 10 square miles.

The topography of Covington is mainly flat with some rolling hills in the central part of the city. The city is situated on the banks of the Ohio River and its tributaries which provide a picturesque view from many parts of town. In addition to its riverside setting, Covington also has numerous parks and wooded areas which offer plenty of outdoor recreational activities for residents to enjoy.

Covington’s climate is typical for this region with hot summers and cold winters. The temperature usually ranges from an average low in January around 20 degrees Fahrenheit to an average high in July around 85 degrees Fahrenheit. Precipitation levels are relatively consistent throughout the year with averages ranging from 2-3 inches per month on average.

The city’s economy relies heavily on manufacturing, transportation, and retail services which contribute significantly to its overall economic health. Additionally, Covington has numerous educational institutions ranging from public schools to universities which help drive job growth in the area as well as attract students from all over the world to study there.

Overall, Covington’s geography offers a unique combination of natural beauty and modern amenities that make it an ideal place for both living and working. With its riverside location and temperate climate, Covington provides residents with plenty of recreational opportunities while also providing businesses with access to major transportation routes for easy access to other cities in this region or beyond.

Covington, Kentucky

History of Covington, Kentucky

Covington, Kentucky is a city with a rich and storied history. The first settlers of Covington arrived in 1790 and the town was officially founded in 1815. The city was named after General Leonard Covington, a Revolutionary War hero, and quickly grew into an important port on the Ohio River.

In the early 19th century, Covington experienced rapid growth due to its prime location on the river and its emerging industrial base. By 1820, Covington had become an important center for trade between Louisville and Cincinnati with many goods being shipped to other parts of the country via the Ohio River.

Covington’s economy continued to grow throughout the 19th century as it became an important stop on the Underground Railroad for escaped slaves seeking freedom from slavery in neighboring states. In addition to this, Covington also became an important center for various industries such as tobacco processing, paper manufacturing, ironworks, and boat building which helped drive economic growth in the area.

In 1829, Covington became part of Kentucky when it was annexed by the state legislature. During this period of growth and expansion Covington also saw its first public schools being established as well as its first library and newspaper being published.

The 20th century saw further growth in Covington’s economy with new industries such as automotive manufacturing taking root in the area. The city also underwent a number of urban renewal projects during this time period which helped rejuvenate some of its older neighborhoods while also creating new ones such as Latonia which is now one of Covington’s most vibrant areas today.

Today, Covington has become a thriving city that is home to numerous businesses ranging from small local companies to large multinational corporations that have moved into town over recent years due to its prime location near major transportation routes like I-75 which provide easy access to other cities in this region or beyond. It is also home to numerous cultural attractions including parks, museums, theaters and performing arts venues that draw visitors from all over the world each year who come to experience all that this vibrant city has to offer.

Economy of Covington, Kentucky

According to topschoolsintheusa.com, Covington, Kentucky is a city in the northern part of the state that is known for its rich history and diverse economy. Located on the banks of the Ohio River, Covington has long been an important hub for trade and commerce between Louisville and Cincinnati. Throughout its history, Covington has experienced periods of growth and decline that have shaped its modern economy.

In the early 19th century, Covington was an important center for trade between Louisville and Cincinnati with goods being shipped to other parts of the country via the Ohio River. During this period, Covington also became an important stop on the Underground Railroad for escaped slaves seeking freedom from slavery in neighboring states. By 1820, Covington had become an important center for various industries such as tobacco processing, paper manufacturing, ironworks, and boatbuilding which helped drive economic growth in the area.

The 20th century saw further growth in Covington’s economy with new industries such as automotive manufacturing taking root in the area. The city also underwent a number of urban renewal projects during this time period which helped rejuvenate some of its older neighborhoods while also creating new ones such as Latonia which is now one of Covington’s most vibrant areas today.

Today, Covington’s economy is driven by a mix of small businesses and large corporations that have moved into town over recent years due to its prime location near major transportation routes like I-75 which provide easy access to other cities in this region or beyond. The city also boasts numerous cultural attractions including parks, museums, theaters and performing arts venues which draw visitors from all over the world each year who come to experience all that this vibrant city has to offer.

Covington is home to a wide variety of businesses ranging from small local companies to large multinational corporations including Kroger’s headquarters located downtown. In addition to these larger businesses there are many small independent shops throughout town offering unique products not found elsewhere making it a great place for locals and visitors alike to shop or dine out at one of its many restaurants serving up delicious cuisine from around the world.

Overall, Covington’s economy is thriving thanks to its diverse mix of businesses ranging from small independent shops to large multinational corporations along with numerous cultural attractions that draw visitors each year looking for something special they can only find here in this vibrant city on the banks of the Ohio River.

Politics in Covington, Kentucky

Covington, Kentucky is a vibrant and diverse city situated on the banks of the Ohio River. The city is home to a wide range of people from different backgrounds and lifestyles, making it an important place for politics. Politics in Covington are focused on local issues such as infrastructure, economic development, public safety, and education. The city is represented at the state level by two members of the Kentucky House of Representatives and one member of the Kentucky Senate.

At the local level, Covington has a mayor-council form of government where citizens elect a mayor to serve as chief executive officer of the city. The mayor is elected directly by voters for a four-year term and presides over meetings of the seven-member Board of City Commissioners who are also elected by citizens to serve four-year terms. Together they set policy for Covington’s government departments such as police, fire, parks and recreation, public works, and more.

Covington’s politics are heavily influenced by its location in Northern Kentucky which has been historically Democratic while much of Kentucky is Republican dominated. This can be seen in local elections where candidates from both parties often compete for office though Democrats have traditionally been more successful in Covington than Republicans. In recent years, there has been an increasing presence of third party candidates who have gained some traction among voters looking for an alternative to traditional party politics.

The political landscape in Covington is further shaped by its diverse population which includes many immigrants from around the world who bring their own perspectives on issues like education reform, immigration reform, health care access, economic inequality and more. These voices help shape debates around policy decisions that will ultimately affect all citizens living in this vibrant city on the banks of the Ohio River.

Overall, politics in Covington are driven largely by local issues but also take into account regional perspectives from other parts of Northern Kentucky as well as input from its diverse population which helps create policies that reflect everyone’s needs while also striving towards creating a better future for all those living here now or yet to come.

Ironton-Russell Bridge, Kentucky

Ironton-Russell Bridge, Kentucky

 

Ironton-Russell Bridge
Spans Ohio River
Lanes 1×2
Total length ~800 meters
Main span 274 meters
Bridge deck height ? meter
Opening 21-08-1922 / 23-11-2016
Traffic intensity 3,700 mvt/day
Location Map

According to transporthint, the Ironton-Russell Bridge is a cable- stayed bridge in the United States, located on the border of the states of Kentucky and Ohio. The bridge spans the Ohio River between Ironton, Ohio and Russell, Kentucky.

Characteristics

The bridge is a concrete cable- stayed bridge with two A-shaped pylons. The entire bridge is approximately 800 meters long and is located in a bend from the Ohio side and crosses the Ohio River obliquely. The actual main bridge is 501 meters long and has a main span of 274 meters and two side spans of 113 meters. The bridge deck is 9.8 meters wide. The bridge is an extension of 2nd Street in Ironton, Ohio and opens to an intersection with US 23 in Kentucky, just east of Russell. The bridge also spans a railway line on both sides of the river. It is only one of two bridges over the Ohio River that are also operated by the Ohio Department of Transportation.

History

The original Ironton-Russell Bridge (1922-2016).

The original bridge at this location was a truss bridge with a length of 731 meters and a main span of 221 meters. The bridge was opened on August 21, 1922 and was one of the first bridges over the Ohio River in the region. At the time, it was the first road bridge over the Ohio River between Parkersburg and Cincinnati. The bridge was an extension of Main Street in Russell and Vernon Street in Ironton, although the connecting roads led to Willow Avenue in Russell and Adams Street in Ironton. The bridge was a toll road for some time. The bridge was reinforced in the 1970s.

Construction of the new bridge in 2015.

The 1922 bridge was in poor condition and had the status of ‘structurally deficient’. In addition to the poor condition of the bridge, the bridge was also outdated in design requirements, with a narrow 4 mile road and a sharp bend on the Ironton side. In 2000, a study was carried out to replace the bridge. In 2003 the design was chosen, a concrete cable-stayed bridge, which comes about 1 kilometer upstream from the old bridge. The project was originally scheduled to start around 2006, but the high demand for concrete after Hurricane Katrina resulted in an inflated cost of $110 million. The project has since been scaled down slightly from three to two lanes and cost $81 million. The new bridge is a cable-stayed bridge with two A-shaped pylons. The new bridge is 501 meters long with a main span of 274 meters and two side spans of 113 meters. The bridge deck is 9.8 meters wide, more than three meters wider than the old bridge. The pylons are 91.6 meters high. The bridge was constructed between March 2012 and November 2016. In June 2016, the last concrete was poured and the bridge deck closed on both sides. The bridge opened to traffic on November 23, 2016. On May 17, 2017, the old bridge from 1922 was blown up.

Traffic intensities

Approximately 3,700 vehicles use the bridge every day. The bridge is primarily used by local traffic between both banks of the Ohio River.

John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge

John A. RoeblingSuspension Bridge
Spans Ohio River
Lanes 1×2
Total length 659 meters
Main span 322 meters
Bridge deck height ? meter
Opening 01-12-1866
Traffic intensity 9,200 mvt/day
Location Map

According to travelationary, the John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge is a truss structure suspension bridge in the United States, located on the border of the states of Kentucky and Ohio. The bridge spans the Ohio River in Cincinnati.

Characteristics

The John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge is a total of 659 meters long, with a main span of 322 meters in length. The bridge has two sandstone pylons, with a half-timbered construction hanging from cables. The bridge deck is 7.6 meters wide, with one lane in each direction. The bridge connects downtown Cincinnati with downtown Covington in Kentucky. The bridge is toll-free.

History

Cause

In the mid-19th century, Cincinnati flourished as a port and trading city on the Ohio River. This created the need for a fixed bridge connection. One problem was that the Ohio River in Cincinnati is wide, wider than, say, the Wheeling Suspension Bridge in West Virginia, opened in 1849. In 1846 the Covington and Cincinnati Bridge Company was created to carry out the construction.

The first plans of engineer John A. Roebling envisaged a bridge of 370 meters in length with a vertical clearance of 30 meters. This one had one major drawback, a large pylon in the middle of the Ohio River. A bridge with a span of 430 meters was later planned, but the collapse of a suspension bridge in Newport over the Licking River meant that no investors could be found. In 1856 sufficient funds became available and the span plans were shortened to a more feasible 300 metres.

Aptitude

Construction began in September 1856 with the foundation of the pylon on the Covington side. On the Cincinnati side there were problems with the soil conditions and a hole was dug down to the hard soil under the Ohio River. Construction was halted for a long time in the winter and spring and was not resumed until July 1857. Later that year there was the “panic of 1857” and people ran out of money, so that construction was halted for a year. Work on the pylon resumed in July 1858, but work was halted again in 1859-1860 due to the death of the chairman of the Covington and Cincinnati Bridge Company.

In 1861 the American Civil War broke out. A pontoon bridge was hastily built near Cincinnati to defend the city from Confederate troops. It became clear what advantages a fixed bridge had, so that money became available again for construction. Work on the bridge resumed in the spring of 1864. The tethers were manufactured in Manchester, England. This is because the English cables were considered to be of better quality than the American ones. In 1865-1866 the cables over the river were installed between the pylons. Then the bridge deck was installed, which consisted of iron girders and wooden planks. On December 1, 1866, the bridge opened to pedestrians. When opened, it was the longest suspension bridge in the world.

Adjustments

The bridge deck was of inferior quality due to the inflation of the American Civil War, but the pylons were built to support a much heavier bridge deck. In 1896 the bridge was significantly modified, the bridge deck was reinforced with steel and the bridge on the Cincinnati side was modified.

The bridge was originally a toll bridge. The bridge was originally privately owned until 1953, when the state of Kentucky took over the bridge. The toll was scrapped in 1963, when the Brent Spence Bridge off Interstate 75 opened. The bridge got its current name in 1983. Between 2006 and 2008 the bridge was renovated. The maximum permissible weight was also reduced to 11 tons. A renovation followed in 2021, during which the bridge was closed for almost the entire year.

Traffic intensities

9,400 vehicles cross the bridge every day. This makes it the busiest non-motorway bridge in the region.

John A. Roebling Suspension

Kentucky Geography

Kentucky Geography

Kentucky. It is part of the American geography, being one of the 50 states that make up the United States, with Frankfor being its capital.

Rivers and lakes

Kentucky has more than 140,000 km of river currents that provide one of the largest and most complex river systems in the United States. among which are:

  • Lake Cumberland, the largest man-made lake east of the Mississippi by volume of water.
  • Kentucky Lake the largest in area.

Kentucky is the only American state that has three rivers as a border with other states.

  • The Mississippi River to the west
  • The Ohio River to the north.
  • The Big Sandy River to the east.

Its main internal channels include the Kentucky, Tennessee, Cumberland, Verde and Licking rivers, although it has only three major natural lakes, many man-made lakes are located in the state. Kentucky also has more navigable kilometers of water than any other state in the US., After Alaska.

Climate

According to Abbreviationfinder, Kentucky has a temperate climate, with hot summers and relatively cold winters. The temperature in the state does not vary much from one region to another.

In winter, the average temperatures of 2 ° C, while the center-north has an average temperature of -1 ° C. The lowest temperature recorded was -37 ° C, in Shelbyville, on January 28, 1963.

During the summer, the highest temperatures are recorded in the west, the average temperature in the summer, in the western tip of Kentucky, is 28 ° C. The highest temperature recorded in Kentucky was 46 ° C, in Greensburg, on July 28, 1930.

Races and ethnicities

The racial composition of the Kentucky population is made up of:

  • Whites
  • African American
  • Asian
  • American natives.

The median age of the population is 37.3 years, the five largest groups in Kentucky by descent are: Americans, who make up 20.9% of the population (the vast majority are of English and Scottish descent), Germans (12.7%) Irish (10.5%), English (9.7%) and African American (7.3%).

Religion

There is a wide religious culture, since a large number of denominations are registered in this state:

  • Evangelical Churches Southern Baptist Convention.
  • Independent Christian Churches.
  • Church of Christ.
  • Protestant Churches United Methodist Church.
  • Disciples of Christ.
  • Eastern churches.

Main cities

According to CountryAAH.com, Kentucky’s most populous cities, as well as most of the fastest growing counties, are concentrated in an area known as the Golden Triangle, in the Bluegrass region, in the north-central part of the state. The exceptions are Hardin, LaRue and Meade counties, located in the southwest of the state.

  • The most populous city in Kentucky is Louisville.
  • The second is Lexington, which it owned, with its metropolitan region.
  • The seven counties located in the extreme north, in the region called Northern Kentucky, which is part of the metropolitan region of Cincinnati (a city located in the neighboring state of Ohio).

Education

Among the most relevant educational centers in Kentucky are:

  • Kentucky Colleges
  • Kentucky Business Schools
  • Kentucky Art Schools
  • Kentucky Community Colleges

Economy

The Economy is marked in several sectors:

  • The primary sector we can find agriculture and livestock, the main agricultural products of the state are horses, cattle, tobacco, dairy products, pigs, soybeans and corn.
  • The secondary sector is industrialized and mining, where the main products are transport equipment, chemical products, electrical equipment, machinery, food going in procession, tobacco products, coal, tourism.
  • The third sector that marks the Kentucky economy, falls on community and personal services, tourism as the main one, financial services and real estate.

About 97% of the electricity generated in the state is produced by coal-fired thermoelectric plants, and the rest is produced mostly in natural gas thermoelectric plants.

Media

Newspapers

Currently in Kentucky about 160 newspapers are published, of which about 20 are daily.

  • The Kentucky Gazette, was the first newspaper published in Kentucky, first published in Lexington in 1787.
  • The Advertiser, Kentucky’s oldest newspaper still in circulation, was first published in 1818, in Louisville.

Radio stations

Kentucky owns about 200 radio stations, Kentucky’s first radio station was founded in 1922, in Louisville.

TV station

Currently, there are approximately 30 television stations, the first television station in the state was founded in 1948, also in Louisville.

Kentucky Geography

Culture

It is generally considered within Kentucky culture, horse racing and gambling.

  • The main horse racing day, the Kentucky Derby, is preceded by the two-week “Kentucky Derby Festival.”
  • Louisville is also the host of the Kentucky State Fair, the “Kentucky Shakespeare Festival”, and the featured National Quartets Convention “Gospel of the South” festival.
  • Owensboro, Kentucky’s third largest city, credits its self-styled nickname of the Barbecue Capital of the World by hosting the “International Bar-BQ Festival” each year.
  • Bowling Green, Kentucky’s fifth-largest city and home to the only assembly plant in the world that makes the Chevrolet Corvette, opened the National Corvette Museum in 1994.
  • The small town of Hodgenville, birthplace of Abraham Lincoln, receives the annual celebration of the “Day of Lincoln” and also held in February of 2008 the implementation of the “National Celebration of the Bicentennial of Abraham Lincoln ” commemoration that will celebrate throughout the country for two years.